Save the Date! Join us to celebrate our 10-year anniversary on September 25th at The Bindery. Sign up for our newsletter to receive an invite.

Green

San Francisco less progressive than it thinks, says outgoing green chief

Victoria Schlesinger, The Public Press — Dec 2 2009 - 4:46pm

After eight years as the director of the city’s Department of the Environment, Jared Blumenfeld is leaving the position in January for a bigger job.

Shipyard protest targets Lennar, Navy plans for toxic land

Hank Drew and Patricia Decker, The Public Press — Jul 1 2009 - 9:52pm

More than 100 protesters enjoyed a beautiful sunny Tuesday afternoon in the shadow of one of the most toxic plots of land in California.

News Notes: San Francisco set to go more green

Hank Drew, The Public Press — Jun 8 2009 - 11:17am

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors could require residential and commercial building owners to sign up for composting and recycling services.

If the new mandatory recycling and composting law is approved by the supervisors tomorrow, violators would be charged a $500 fine. The proposal is up for its first reading at the June 9 Board of Supervisors meeting.

San Francisco already recycles 72 percent of its garbage, which is one of the highests recycling rates in the nation. City officials are aiming to recycle 100 percent by 2020.

News Notes: Navy stalling on Hunters Point cleanup

Hank Drew, The Public Press — Jun 3 2009 - 12:27pm

In 2000, 86 percent of San Francisco voters agreed that cleaning up the toxic Hunters Point Shipyard was vital for the area's well-being.

The Navy is considering sealing and capping Parcel E2 and handing over the area to the city. This could lead to a potentially hazardous situation in the new Bayview-Hunters Point development area.

The Navy has spent millions of dollars cleaning up the Shipyard only to leave Parcel E2, the site of the Navy's industrial dump, untouched. Parcel E2 contains the massive glob of contaminates that caught fire in 2000 and continued burning for six months.

A tour of toxic hot spots in the Bay Area

www.newsdesk.org — Jun 2 2009 - 5:38pm

The reputation of the Bay Area as a haven for sustainable lifestyle practices, the cradle for the slow food movement and solar energy development reaches far and wide, but it is also the home to pockets of persistent toxic trouble spots, partly as a legacy of past manufacturing activity and partly a result of ongoing business practices. This legacy has real and detrimental effects on the lives of those who live and raise families there.

Two experienced journalists, Kwan Booth and Kim Komenich, are working for Newsdesk.org in partnership with the journalism micro-funding site Spot.us, to identify and tell the narrative of a neglected community in the Bay Area that suffers from this type of pollution and ecological degradation.

The stories come in a multimedia package of photography, audio commentary and text reporting, with the goal of creating a rich audio-visual narrative to give a voice and reveal the lives and challenges of real people who are often reduced to statistics in policy papers.

News Notes: Budget cuts lead to UCSC hunger strike

Leyna Lightman, The Public Press — May 27 2009 - 11:28pm

In anticipation of Wednesday’s Earth Day celebration, Berkeley Farmers’ Market has stepped up to the “green” plate – by becoming the first market in the nation to eliminate all plastic bags and packaging.

“We’ve been anti-plastic for a long time, but we’re also committed to our farmers and didn’t want to negatively impact them through diminished sales or costs,” said Ben Feldman, program manager of The Ecology Center – an environmental non-profit that has run the markets since 1987.

The market launched its “Zero Waste” campaign March 7, demanding all farmers’ market refuse be recyclable or compostable. The new rule includes materials for bagging produce as well as containers and utensils for prepared foods.

Farmers’ Market says no to all plastics

Leyna Lightman, Apr 22 2009 - 3:11pm

In anticipation of Wednesday’s Earth Day celebration, Berkeley Farmers’ Market has stepped up to the “green” plate – by becoming the first market in the nation to eliminate all plastic bags and packaging.

“We’ve been anti-plastic for a long time, but we’re also committed to our farmers and didn’t want to negatively impact them through diminished sales or costs,” said Ben Feldman, program manager of The Ecology Center – an environmental non-profit that has run the markets since 1987.

The market launched its “Zero Waste” campaign March 7, demanding all farmers’ market refuse be recyclable or compostable. The new rule includes materials for bagging produce as well as containers and utensils for prepared foods.

Prop. H: Energy Measure Spurs Conflicting Claims

www.newsdesk.org / The Public Press — Oct 16 2008 - 4:29pm

Proposition H is described as a clean energy measure by its proponents, and a "blank check" by its opponents. With an eye-popping $5.4 million spent on the No on H side compared to the $19,000 on the other, Proposition H merits a close look from voters. Those are dollars spent through September. Expect more money to flow in these next few weeks, as the opposing forces battle over the definitions, costs and consequences of the measure.

Syndicate content