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election

Mapping S.F. City Hall's Political Divide Through Data

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Aug 29 2018 - 8:27am

When media outlets and pundits have argued that San Francisco officials were politically progressive or moderate, it mostly was based on observation and conjecture. But now, such assertions are buttressed with data. We show you who's which at City Hall.

Election Day Roundup: The Best of the Links

Michael Winter, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 5 2018 - 2:43pm

Still haven’t voted? Still undecided? Not sure where to cast your ballot or to register first? Just hungry for anything about the Big Day? We’ll point you to sources that can help feed the need and satisfy the cravings. Polls close at 8 p.m.

African-American Groups Convene Candidate Forum

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — May 3 2018 - 9:10am

Three African-American groups are sponsoring a May 5 candidate forum to focus attention on issues important to the black community. Organizers have invited all candidates running for San Francisco mayor, District 8 supervisor, Superior Court and the 12th Congressional District.

Proposition F: Free Legal Aid for Tenants Facing Eviction

Andrew Stelzer, San Francisco Public Press — May 1 2018 - 7:00am

On June 5, city voters could make history by guaranteeing legal help to anyone facing eviction, regardless of income. If Proposition F passes, it would make San Francisco the first city to pass such a law through a voter-approved initiative, and boost the national “right to counsel” movement.

S.F. Vote Counters Pushing to Finish by Thanksgiving

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 18 2016 - 6:36pm

With San Franciscans still focused on President-elect Trump as Thanksgiving approaches, city officials continue to feverishly tabulate tens of thousands of ballots from the Nov. 8 election.

Candidates: District 3 Supervisor

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 19 2015 - 3:00pm

District 3 supervisorial seat on Nov. 3: incumbent Julie Christensen, former supervisor Aaron Peskin and Chinatown organizer Wilma Pang. Who are they and what are their priorities?

San Francisco props A and B pass; millions more for school, safety retrofits

Theresa Seiger, SF Public Press — Jun 9 2010 - 4:55pm

San Francisco voters approved measures to retrofit schools and emergency services facilities Tuesday in an election in which five of seven local propositions passed. Twenty-three percent of voters showed up at San Francisco’s 590 precincts, passing propositions A, B, D, E and F. Proposition A, which will extend through 2030 a special property tax that was enacted in 1990, was approved by 69.9 percent of voters. Proposition B, the Earthquake Safety and Emergency Response Bond, was approved by 79.2 percent of voters.

Prop. A looks to extend school parcel tax another 20 years

Theresa Seiger, SF Public Press — Jun 7 2010 - 5:25pm

Proposition A on Tuesday's ballot seeks to extend a 1990 parcel tax aimed at helping fund capital improvements in the San Francisco Unified School District. In addition to authorizing the tax for another 20 years, it would also allow it to be increased annually, up to 2 percent, based on inflation.

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Prop. B would fix emergency water system, move police command center

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Jun 7 2010 - 3:55pm

A $412 million bond measure goes before San Francisco voters on Tuesday. The money would go toward the repair of the aging emergency water system and for replacement of the police department's emergency command center. The measure is considered a key component in getting the city ready to handle the next big earthquake.

The USGS forecasts a 66 percent chance of a magnitude 6.7 or greater earthquake hitting the Bay Area within the next 30 years.

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Fact check: ‘Yes on Prop 16’ ads don’t convey PG&E’s huge fingerprints

Dana Sherne, SF Public Press — Jun 6 2010 - 5:23pm

Tuesday’s statewide election features a controversial industry-backed proposition that would amend the California Constitution to require a two-thirds vote before a community could change its energy provider. The largest tonnage of paper political ads flooding mailboxes in San Francisco sport a variety of images — some ominous, some silly and sarcastic — but the same message: Proposition 16, the “Taxpayers Right to Vote Act,” protects voters from spendthrift politicians. But the ads, paid for mostly by incumbent power provider Pacific Gas & Electric Co., are misleading in a few important ways.

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