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Civil Rights

Letter From the Editors: Don’t Take Civil Rights for Granted

San Francisco Public Press — Jan 19 2017 - 6:33pm

Education or deportation? That’s one startling question we are grappling with as San Francisco becomes more of a political outlier in the aftermath of the 2016 elections. The imminent need for documenting this divergence makes our jobs as independent local journalists more important than ever.

This letter is also available in Spanish, Chinese and Arabic.

Community Leaders Strategize How Noncitizens Can Vote Amid Trump Vow of Deportation

Helena Ong, San Francisco Public Press — Dec 14 2016 - 6:19pm

The election of Donald Trump has cast a pall of fear and uncertainty after passage of Proposition N, as local stakeholders scramble to figure out how to enable the city’s undocumented immigrant residents to vote for members of the Board of Education without increasing their risk of deportation, which the president-elect has threatened.

S.F. mayor signs civil rights ordinance into law

Elliot Owen, New American Media — May 10 2012 - 2:48pm

San Francisco civil rights advocates concerned about what they call domestic spying on the city’s Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim and South Asian communities are celebrating new legislation signed into law by Mayor Ed Lee. The Safe San Francisco Civil Rights Ordinance requires San Francisco Police Department officers working with the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force to be bound by local and state laws strictly governing intelligence gathering of First Amendment protected activities like religious worship.

Bay Area directors explore post-9/11 FBI entrapment in ‘Better This World’

Michael Levitin, SF Public Press — May 16 2011 - 2:56pm

Winner of the best documentary feature award at the San Francisco International Film Festival earlier this month, “Better This World,” a film by Kelly Duane de la Vega and Katie Galloway, looks at what happened to two young Texas activists imprisoned for allegedly plotting terrorist acts at the 2008 Republican National Convention in Minneapolis, and the dubious role that one charismatic activist played in their downfall. The co-directors spoke with the Public Press about domestic security problems, what drove them to make the film, and why the rest of us should care.

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