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Politics

Occupy Oakland protesters push for general strike

Alima Catellacci and Alejandra Cuéllar, SF Public Press — Oct 27 2011 - 2:30pm
The day after a tumultuous confrontation between police and the protesters of the Occupy Oakland movement, more than 2,000 people gathered Wednesday at the civic center to vent their outrage at the heavy-handed eviction tactics, which included launching teargas into the crowd. Thousands of protesters convened in the early evening in an amphitheater in what they were calling Oscar Grant Plaza — officially Frank Ogawa plaza at City Hall, renamed after the victim of a police shooting on BART last year — to discuss the events of the previous 48 hours.

Q&A: Candidates for San Francisco district attorney

Rina Palta, KALW News and SF Public Press — Oct 27 2011 - 12:00pm

Fourth interview is with George Gascon

One of the more important and most overlooked races in San Francisco is the campaign to be the city’s next district attorney. When Kamala Harris left the post for state office last year, outgoing Mayor Gavin Newsom appointed then-Police Chief George Gascon to take her place. Now, Gascon is running for a full four-year term, but faces stiff competition from four other candidates. Previously, we spoke with Bill Fazio, David Onek, and Sharmin Bock. Today, we sit down with Gascon.

S.F. should stop syphoning funds from transit agency: mayoral candidate Adachi on Muni

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Oct 26 2011 - 3:08pm
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Can S.F.’s next mayor save Muni? - Part 1

Public Defender Jeff Adachi, a candidate for mayor of San Francisco, said Muni must live up to its voter-mandated on-time performance rate of 85 percent. How does he plan to do that if elected? One of his ideas is to stop city departments from taking resources from the transit agency, known as work orders. Work orders are charges from city departments to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. Last year SF 311 charged the agency for each customer assistance call related to Muni, which resulted in a $6.3 million bill.

Q&A: Candidates for San Francisco district attorney

Jason Winshell, Hank Drew and Rina Palta, SF Public Press and KALW News — Oct 26 2011 - 12:17pm

Third interview is with Sharmin Bock

One of the more important and most overlooked races in San Francisco is the campaign to be the city’s next district attorney. When Kamala Harris left the post for state office last year, outgoing Mayor Gavin Newsom appointed then-Police Chief George Gascon to take her place. Now, Gascon is running for a full four-year term, but faces stiff competition from four other candidates. Previously, we spoke with Bill Fazio and David Onek. Today, we feature Sharmin Bock, a San Francisco native and longtime prosecutor in Alameda County, known especially for her work on child sex trafficking. Bock sat down with Jason Winshell and Hank Drew from the San Francisco Public Press.  

Q&A: Candidates for San Francisco district attorney

Rina Palta, KALW News and SF Public Press — Oct 25 2011 - 12:01pm

Second interview is with David Onek

One of the more important and most overlooked races in San Francisco is the campaign to be the city’s next district attorney. When Kamala Harris left the post for state office last year, outgoing Mayor Gavin Newsom appointed then-Police Chief George Gascon to take her place. Now, Gascon is running for a full four-year term, but faces stiff competition from four other candidates. Yesterday, we spoke with Bill Fazio. Today, we turn to David Onek, a longtime criminal justice reformer and founding director of the Center for Criminal Justice at U.C. Berkeley’s School of Law.

Researchers use S.F. mayoral candidates’ positions to rethink their places on ideological spectrum

Dhyana Levey, SF Public Press — Oct 24 2011 - 3:41pm

Political scientists are trying to measure the ideology of candidates for mayor of San Francisco in an effort to give voters a better guide as to who most closely shares their views. San Francisco’s crowded field of 16 candidates and a ranked-choice voting system, which some find baffling, seemed to be the ideal testing ground for a project that measures mayoral hopefuls positions by surveying them on past actions at the Board of Supervisors and on current policy debates. Voters aren’t always as well informed as they can be for city elections, which tend to attract less attention than national races and also lack the party labels that help distinguish each candidate, said Christopher S. Elmendorf, a professor of law at the University of California, Davis, and a visiting professor at U.C. Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco.

Q&A: Candidates for San Francisco district attorney

Rina Palta, KALW News and SF Public Press — Oct 24 2011 - 12:42pm

First interview is with Bill Fazio

One of the more important and most overlooked races in San Francisco is the campaign to be the city’s next district attorney. When Kamala Harris left the post for state office last year, outgoing Mayor Gavin Newsom appointed then-Police Chief George Gascon to take her place. Now, Gascon is running for a full four-year term, but faces stiff competition from four other candidates. We’ll be posting interviews with all five of the candidates for district attorney this week. First up: Bill Fazio, a longtime prosecutor and defense attorney who grew up in San Francisco.

Behind the protest signs: The voices of Occupy San Francisco

Christopher D. Cook, SF Public Press — Oct 20 2011 - 9:05am

Those drawn to the movement are thinking big, and broad

Beyond the slogans and chants, what is this occupation movement about and why is it catching like wildfire? What do the growing ranks of Occupy Wall Street/San Francisco/fill-in-the-blank hope comes of this tempest of progressivism? In an emerging movement where everyone and no one is a spokesperson, and where centralized demands and hierarchy are eschewed, there is no single, or simple, answer. But there are plenty willing to express their varied hopes for the ultimate outcome to the protests.

READERS HELPED FUND THIS REPORTING THROUGH A MICRO-FUNDING CAMPAIGN ON SPOT.US

Saving the UC — but at what cost?

Holly Kernan, KALW Crosscurrents — Oct 17 2011 - 12:46pm

In the University of California system, officials are considering raising fees as much as 16 percent a year through 2015. To learn more about what this means for students, and for public education in California, KALW’s Holly Kernan spoke with UC’s student liaison to the Regents, Jonathan Stein. Stein is a graduate student in public policy and law at UC Berkeley, and he’s one of two students represented in the University’s decision-making body.

Governor signs bills to ban open carry of handguns, shark fin sales

Jerold Chinn and Richard Pestorich, SF Public Press — Oct 10 2011 - 11:18am

Gov. Jerry Brown has signed bills to make it illegal to openly carry handguns and to ban the sale and possession of shark fins in California. The shark fin bill goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2013 while the open carry ban begins Jan 1, 2012. The shark bill has been a controversial topic in the past few months, with state Sen. Leland Yee, who is running for San Francisco mayor, calling the ban “insensitive to the Chinese culture” when the bill was introduced by Assemblyman Paul Fong in February.

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