The Public Press is meeting with neighborhood groups in San Francisco. Can we talk to you?

Wealth & poverty

How Media Coverage on Homelessness Falls Short (And What Reporters Can Do About It)

Hye-Jin Kim and Meka Boyle, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 22 2016 - 8:00am

In many newsrooms, “the homeless” is a well-worn catchphrase for the often-anonymous people on the street or in shelters. But many professionals who work with these populations on a daily basis find the term offensive and misleading.

With Cost of Living Rising Fast, Experts Seek Solutions

Meka Boyle, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 8 2016 - 5:36pm

Live discussion on the cost of living: Everyone in San Francisco knows the cost of living has skyrocketed. What they might not realize is that consumer prices — led by escalating housing costs — are leaving many low- and middle-income families struggling to stay in the city while remaining above the poverty level.

San Francisco to Expand Health Insurance Support

Angela Woodall, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:49pm

San Francisco is offering a new, subsidized plan and expanding Healthy San Francisco for city residents who need — but cannot afford — health insurance.

State Subsidies Lag Behind Local Child-Care Costs

Tanya Dzekon, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:47pm

The income cutoff to qualify for subsidies is based on the 2005 state median income, while the average cost of putting a San Francisco preschooler in care full time has almost doubled since then.

Well-Off Foodies, Bargain-Hunters, Cruise Different Aisles

Caroline Cakebread, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:42pm

Two different stores that target two distinct populations with different priorities: One serves the area’s longtime Latino residents; the other caters to those who can afford premium prices for freshness and the cachet of buying from local vendors.

In the Heart of Tech, a Persistent Digital Divide

Peter Snarr, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:31pm

Internet access is increasingly taken for granted — for finding a job, attending all levels of school, managing a business, entertainment and communication. But 100,000 San Francisco residents cannot afford a home connection.

A Tale of Two Markets

Mark Hedin and Geoff Link, Central City Extra — Jan 21 2016 - 3:01pm

Mid-Market stores are worlds apart, a sign of rapid change.

Affordable Housing Requirements in Question at California Supreme Court

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 21 2015 - 12:46pm

A case involving San Jose that is now before the state Supreme Court could hamper affordable housing construction statewide.

Bay Area Food Stamp Recipients Can Soon Shop Online

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 9 2015 - 10:30am

Bay Area residents who rely on food stamps to buy groceries soon will be able to use them online.

As Courts Flip-Flopped on School Integration, Diversity Has Remained Elusive

Sanne Bergh and Paul Lorgerie, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 5 2015 - 5:26pm

By 2005, when a federal judge lifted the most recent desegregation orders, San Francisco Unified School District had been trying for more than three decades to make its schools more racially and socioeconomically diverse, starting in 1971 with forced busing. San Francisco schools no longer exhibit the level of racial isolation they once did, but they are now resegregating, as are many others across the country. In 2013–2014, in more than one-quarter of city schools, 60 percent of the students were of one race. That is a far cry from 1966, when more than one-third of the schools had student populations with 80 percent or more belonging to a single racial group. (In 2014, just three schools were segregated to that degree.)

Syndicate content