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sit-lie

How Media Coverage on Homelessness Falls Short (And What Reporters Can Do About It)

Hye-Jin Kim and Meka Boyle, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 22 2016 - 8:00am

In many newsrooms, “the homeless” is a well-worn catchphrase for the often-anonymous people on the street or in shelters. But many professionals who work with these populations on a daily basis find the term offensive and misleading.

S.F. BOARD WATCH: Jack Spade Inspires Higher Threshold for Chain Store Ban

Josh Wolf, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 29 2013 - 10:48am

The restrictions on formula retail that apply to sections of San Francisco could soon be modified to expand the definition of what constitutes a chain store.  Plus: Dogs in the park  |  Sleeping in the park

Most Haight merchants say nothing changed on street after ‘sit-lie’ prohibition

T.J. Johnston, SF Public Press — Jul 16 2012 - 11:36am

A majority of retailers surveyed last November in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood said the enactment of San Francisco’s sit-lie law hasn’t worked as expected: Homeless people still hang out in front of their businesses.  An independent research report commissioned by the city found that 58 percent of the merchants in the district — the focus of a political battle that led to voter approval of the ban in 2010 — say the same number of people or more continue to park themselves on sidewalks. Sixty-one percent said they encountered sidewalk sitters at least three times per week.

2010 ‘sit-lie’ law could cost city thousands to jail repeat offenders

T.J. Johnston, SF Public Press — Apr 26 2011 - 4:42pm

It took two cops to nab Charles Donovan outside Coffee to the People on the corner of Haight and Masonic streets. Dressed in camouflage and carrying a sign that read, “Need food,” Donovan was whisked away, ordered to remove his sunglasses and duly patted down. The officers told him he was being detained. A barista saw the scene and ran outside to intervene.  Donovan, eventually, was let go with a warning as the cops wrote down his name in their notebooks. His offense? Reclining on a large backpack against a tree outside the coffee house, an activity that stands in violation of San Francisco’s newly enacted “sit-lie” ordinance. Dozens of others haven’t gotten off as easily as Donovan since the city started enforcing the law in February. None, yet, have gone to jail for a repeat offense; but that could soon change in the coming months, eventually costing the city nearly $4,000 per arrest after the third offense.

Success of SF sidewalk sitting ban a surprise to some at Democratic election-night event

Kayla Kuhn, Todd Andersen and Akina Chargualaf, SF Public Press — Nov 4 2010 - 11:02am

As the election results were streaming in projected on a large screen behind performers at the Great American Music Hall in San Francisco Tuesday night, the disappointment with the passing of Proposition L was palpable. Proposition L, the highly scrutinized sit-lie ordinance backed by Democratic Mayor Gavin Newsom, will restrict people from sitting or lying on sidewalks from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., with certain exceptions. “That law passed? That sounds crazy,” said Harrison Gough, a 23-year-old businessman who joined the crowd at the event, sponsored by the San Francisco Democrats and the San Francisco Labor Council, for the camaraderie, the booze and free appetizers.

On poison pills slipped into San Francisco’s ballot propositions

Kayla Kuhn, SF Public Press — Nov 2 2010 - 2:20pm

So-called poison pills are written into two measures on the current ballot to nullify an opposing proposition in the event that both are voted in. Also known as wrecking measures, they are created by a legislator who disagrees with another proposition and wants to undermine it. Ballot propositions cannot be amended. This year there are two dueling pairs: Proposition K would nullify J, and Proposition M would nullify L.

Sit, lie, get deported? (graphic novel)

SF Public Press — Jun 29 2010 - 5:25pm

Reporting by Shawn Gaynor; illustration by Andrew Goldfarb Sit, Lie, Get Deported? (graphic novel) Read more...

Supervisors consider sidewalk policing as public debate heats up

Shawn Gaynor, SF Public Press — May 11 2010 - 5:34pm

The simmering debate on Mayor Gavin Newsom’s proposed restrictions on sitting and lying on the streets, the so-called “sit-lie” legislation, lined up advocates on both sides in what one city supervisor termed a culture war on San Francisco’s streets. Regardless of what the Board of Supervisors does with the plan — and they are likely to pan it — it could find new life on the ballot if the mayor presses forward.

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