Public health

Kellogg’s recalls cereals; Lucky Supermarkets in the city affected

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Jun 25 2010 - 3:25pm

Kellogg's Co. announced Friday morning it was voluntarily recalling 28 million boxes of its cereal brands because of an unusual smell and taste. The affected cereals include Apple Jacks, Froot Loops, Corn Pops and Honey Smacks.

Brakes put on indigent transportation program

Conor Gallagher, SF Public Press — Jun 17 2010 - 6:01pm

The homeless and disabled are facing proposed cuts to a program that provides them with transportation to pick up prescriptions and obtain medical treatment. Mobile Assistance Patrol is facing a $300,000 reduction in funds for the 2010-2011 fiscal year, which means that the transportation service will operate for shelter clients only at night.

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Agricultural production in Central Valley leaves toxic legacy for locals

Erica Gies, KALW Public Radio — Mar 24 2010 - 12:34pm

One of the perks of living in the Bay Area is the wide variety of fresh, local produce we enjoy year-round. Much of that comes thanks to our proximity to the Central Valley, one of the most productive agricultural regions the world has ever seen. Unfortunately, this luxury comes at a price, although we aren’t the ones paying it.

Gay teen shelter closure helps span city budget gap

Monica Jensen, SF Public Press — Jan 27 2010 - 2:47pm

The Ark House, a faith-based shelter for black gay, lesbian and bisexual teens, may shut its doors March 1 if the Department of Health’s proposed cuts are approved. The program’s closure, which is expected to save the city more than $400,000 a year, is one of a handful the city hopes to enact in the middle of its fiscal year to balance the budget. The projected deficit for the year starting in July is $522.2 million.

Citywide vaccine clinic plans began years ago

Monica Jensen and Jon Kawamoto, SF Public Press — Dec 24 2009 - 1:52pm
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The plans for Tuesday's vaccine clinic, in which thousands of San Franciscans received swine flu shots, had been in the works for years, according to a spokeswoman for the city Department of Public Health.

Supervisors: holidays a bad time to lay off city workers

Monica Jensen, The Public Press — Nov 25 2009 - 6:59pm

More than 500 low-wage city workers threatened with job and pay cuts this fall received a holiday-themed reprieve Tuesday, as the Board of Supervisors delayed layoffs in the hopes of finding federal and state funds to prevent cutbacks.

City finds millions to rehire laid-off nurses, clerical workers

Kevin Stark, The Public Press — Nov 4 2009 - 10:14pm

San Francisco city leaders have found an extra pot of $8 million they hope to use as a patch on the summer’s tattered budget, potentially rescuing more than 500 frontline workers already given pink slips or downgraded to lower-paying jobs.

546 city workers get layoff notices, but many will be rehired, paid less

Kevin Stark, Oct 1 2009 - 12:57pm

The city has sent layoff notices to 546 health and clerical workers, but that doesn't mean the public payroll will shrink by 546 jobs come mid-November. City officials are still deciding how many workers will be reclassified and then rehired at lower pay. The SEIU claims Mayor Gavin Newsom has reneged on a deal to save all the jobs.

Mission Neighborhood Resource Center's 'Ladies’ Night' saved by supervisors

Monica Jensen, The Public Press — Aug 20 2009 - 4:20pm
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Study to examine HIV infection among gay black men

Bethany Fleishman, The Public Press — Jul 23 2009 - 12:33pm

A new, national study on HIV infection will look at San Francisco's gay black male community's level of participation in HIV intervention measures – including testing, counseling and other health and social services.

The San Francisco Department of Public Health HIV Research Section AIDS Office will be conducting the San Francisco part of the UNITY study.

Among men who have sex with men in this country, black men have the highest rate of HIV infection. Jennifer Sarche, community educator for the Department of Public Health AIDS Office, said that one theory for this is that gay black men as a population have a smaller sexual network than gay white males.

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