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Economy

Hearst Corp. threatens to close Chronicle

Bethany Fleishman, The Public Press — Feb 24 2009 - 6:56pm

The Hearst Corp. announced Tuesday that it would be forced to sell or close the San Francisco Chronicle if it could not make needed “critical” cost-cutting measures, including job cuts, in coming weeks.

The company said the paper lost $50 million in 2008. A memo to employees from the publisher, Frank Vega, said the paper could no longer bear the “staggering losses,” which he said were worsening in the current recession.

“Survival is the outcome we all want to achieve,” said a statement from Hearst quoting two top executives, Frank A. Bennack, Jr., vice chairman and chief executive officer, Hearst Corporation, and Steven R. Swartz, president of Hearst Newspapers.

The return of Hooverville: car and tent cities on the rise in San Francisco

Thea Chroman, The Public Press — Feb 10 2009 - 6:13pm

San Francisco’s per capita homeless rate has long been the highest in the country. But in the past year, it has shot up 40 percent, by some measures. The increase came as foreclosures put pressure on the rental market, the budget crisis slowed aid, and the job market tightened up.

When the Longevity Revolution Hits Your Town: A Gray Wave Hits Home

Cecily O'Connor, RedwoodAge — Jan 30 2009 - 1:21pm

Changes in cities over the next two decades will be driven by the "longevity revolution" as the ranks of US adults over 60 soar and many more lifespans stretch past the century mark. While these changes present challenges to cities that are ill-equipped or unprepared, they also serve as a wake-up call to tap into the skill and expertise of older adults. These elders represent a key to the solutions, whether it's through volunteer work, sharing professional experience or helping families with childcare.

Proposition B: 'Chump Change' or 'Massive Budget Hole'?

Tim Kingston, The Public Press and Newsdesk.org — Oct 24 2008 - 11:18pm

The battle over public power and the hospital bond have vacuumed up much of San Francisco's attention and political capital this season. But there's an equally significant, if under-the-radar, item up for grabs: Proposition B. The "Establishing [an] Affordable Housing Fund" measure mandates that 2.5 cents out of every $100 in property taxes go to create what is essentially a dedicated San Francisco affordable housing account. Proponents and opponents alike agree that it would raise roughly $2.7 billion over its 15-year lifespan -- in fact, that's about all they agree on.

Brass Tax: Propositions N and Q Levy Businesses, Property

Tim Kingston, www.newsdesk.org / The Public Press — Oct 23 2008 - 10:57am

Propositions N and Q, which would increase and modify San Francisco's property transfer and payroll expense taxes, were the product of intense negotiations between different business groups. Not surprisingly, the winners and losers in those negotiations define the pro and con election advertisements. The laws are simple enough: N would increase the property transfer tax from 0.75 to 1.5 percent on properties worth over $5 million, while Q ensures that partners in law firms have to pay payroll taxes. It also raises the ceiling for payroll tax exemption to $250,000. The city controller states in the voter handbook that the propositions would raise almost $40 million for the city's general fund, but how it does that, and who stands to gain or lose, is not so clearcut.

Prop. K: Untested Theories Drive Prostitution Debate

Bernice Yeung, www.newsdesk.org and The Public Press — Oct 20 2008 - 2:12pm

Proposition K, which seeks to decriminalize prostitution in San Francisco, has spawned a heated debate over how to curb human trafficking and protect the lives and health of sex workers. A close look at campaign advertising around the proposition reveals sharp disagreements between supporters and opponents over what the local impacts of the law would be, as well as a schism in feminist circles over prostitution itself.

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