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Technology

Mountain View or Googleville?

David Boyer, The Intersection — Mar 28 2018 - 2:19pm

The tech industry has brought jobs and unprecedented prosperity to the Mountain View area. This once-small, sleepy agricultural town is now synonymous with progress, wealth and the future. But for people who have lived in Mountain View a long time, the changes are dramatic.

Visionary Solutions to Bayfront Inundation

Mary Catherine O'Connor, SF Public Press — Apr 20 2017 - 8:00am

Responding to sea level rise requires actions that fall into three categories: fortify infrastructure, accommodate higher water and retreat from the shoreline. Given the economic and cultural ties Bay Area residents have to the water — retreat is a hard sell.

What Nevius Gets Wrong About Tech and Politics

Sara Bloomberg, San Francisco Public Press — Sep 9 2016 - 3:28pm

San Francisco Chronicle columnist Chuck “C.W.” Nevius is imploring tech companies “to get into politics, particularly grassroots politics in cities like Oakland and San Francisco.” But he misses the obvious: the tech industry is and has been deeply involved with local politics, led by Ron Conway (photo).

Slick, Misleading TV Ads Paid Off

Meka Boyle, Cody Wright and Michael Winter, Public Press — Aug 18 2016 - 8:00am

The 2015 election united the political clout of two rich, powerful industries that will exert an enduring in uence across the city, Bay Area and nation: real estate and technology.

How San Francisco Plans to Shield Residents From Runaway Prices

Angela Woodall, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 4:01pm

We list some examples of how the city has tried to soften the blow of rising prices, and policies that advocates for low-income people say San Francisco could adopt.

In the Heart of Tech, a Persistent Digital Divide

Peter Snarr, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:31pm

Internet access is increasingly taken for granted — for finding a job, attending all levels of school, managing a business, entertainment and communication. But 100,000 San Francisco residents cannot afford a home connection.

Body Cameras Will Not Be Cheap

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 30 2015 - 4:00pm

San Francisco has become the latest of many cities nationwide where leaders are deciding that the benefits of outfitting police with body cameras outweigh the myriad costs.

Groundwater Depletion Is Destabilizing the San Andreas Fault and Increasing Earthquake Risk

Katherine Bourzac, San Francisco Public Press — May 14 2014 - 10:01am

Research published today also links seasonal water levels to seasonal patterns in seismicity

Depletion of groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley is having wide-ranging effects not just on the agricultural industry and the environment, but also on the very earth beneath our feet. Massive changes in groundwater levels in the southern Central Valley are changing the stresses on the San Andreas Fault, according to research published today.

City Construction Course Offers Job Placements, but Excludes Many Who Could Use a Hand Up

Chorel Centers, San Francisco Public Press — Dec 17 2013 - 5:05pm

Rigorous screening limits candidates, who are groomed for union apprenticeships

San Francisco offers a free 18-week training course through City College that takes low-skill, out-of-work city residents and sets them on the path to construction trade careers. But while the instructors try hard to be inclusive, some city residents who need the program do not satisfy the minimum qualifications, including a high school equivalency degree. For those who matriculate, unions are able to find job placements for 85 percent of graduates, with the help massive construction boom that has raised demand for trade laborers to levels not seen in a decade.

SAN FRANCISCO’S WORKFORCE REBOOT is the cover story in the fall 2013 print edition of the San Francisco Public Press. Check back for updates on other stories.

Big Businesses Use State Tax Fund to Train Their Own Staff

Alex Kekauoha, San Francisco Public Press — Dec 12 2013 - 1:11pm

Some subsidies, worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, are awarded to multinational corporations valued in the billions

State subsidies for vocational training might provide a windfall to large corporations already able to offer similar instruction, if a planned expansion of a program funded through a tax on all businesses in California moves forward. State officials say they aim the vocational training funding at big businesses in key industries that are in danger of relocating to other states. But while tens of thousands of smaller companies pay into the program via the Employment Training Tax, it is hard for most to qualify for grants. Many do not even know the program exists.

SAN FRANCISCO’S WORKFORCE REBOOT is the cover story in the fall 2013 print edition of the San Francisco Public Press. Check back for updates on other stories.

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