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Immigration

State Law Cracks Down on Free Public Meals

Yesica Prado, San Francisco Public Press — Dec 10 2018 - 11:08am

Many city residents who are not housed or are food insecure depend on humanitarian aid from Food Not Bombs to survive. But state regulations taking effect in January jeopardize the group's 35-year mission of sharing food outside the confines of government bureaucracy.

Deja Vu: Proposal Aims to Change Student Placement to Desegregate Schools

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Sep 21 2018 - 12:58pm

Racial segregation in San Francisco public schools is back in the news, with a proposal to change how the district places students into elementary school. This move comes three years after the Public Press reported on how the system was resegregating city schools.

Charters vs. District: The Battle for San Francisco Public Schools

Rob Waters, San Francisco Public Press — Sep 20 2018 - 1:42pm

The conflict between two city schools — and activists on both sides of the issue — reflects a growing battle playing out in San Francisco and across the state.

Bayview School Feeling Squeezed by New Charter

Rob Waters, San Francisco Public Press — Sep 20 2018 - 1:41pm

This fall, the 105 students at the district's Malcolm X Academy began sharing space with 90 pre-kindergartners, kindergartners and first graders attending a new charter school in the same building. “It's hard to share space,” one staff member said.

Cities Sic the Taxman on Vacant ‘Ghost Homes’

Liz Enochs, San Francisco Public Press — Aug 20 2018 - 12:59pm

Is an abundance of vacant units worsening the Bay Area’s housing crisis? That’s what some politicians have suggested. Their solution: a new tax on landlords who leave residential properties unrented. Oakland voters will decide this fall, and San Franciscans may vote next year. Vancouver and Paris already have such levies on the books.

Minority Challengers Wake Up Normally Sleepy Superior Court Races

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — May 9 2018 - 11:00am

Five men and women of color are challenging four incumbent judges on the state Superior Court in San Francisco. The insurgents — four of whom are public defenders — say the veteran jurists are vestiges of a legal system that punishes minorities disproportionately. The candidates faced off May 5 at a forum focused on African-American issues, and sparks flew. Second of two articles.

Candidates Say How They Would Help African-American Community

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — May 7 2018 - 5:45pm

A trio of African-American organizations aimed to get some answers from aspiring local leaders at “Facing the Voters,” a candidates’ forum hosted by the Public Press and moderated by its publisher. The candidates were given the opportunity to lay out their bona fides with respect to this city’s dwindling, marginalized African-American community; some did that and some did not. First of two articles.

An Ethnic Media Beacon Goes Dark, but Its Creator Keeps Inspiring

Rob Waters, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 3 2018 - 7:00am

Sandy Close has made it her life’s work to find and amplify unique voices from different ethnic communities, especially those of the young. For nearly 50 years, Pacific News Service and its successor, New America Media, practiced “journalism from the inside out” by bringing people from many cultures into the newsroom. Last fall, Close had to shutter her organization, but her legacy lives on in dozens of professional journalists who got their start with her.

Immigrants Legally Here for Years Fighting to Stay After Trump Ends Protections

Roberto Lovato, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 13 2018 - 6:00am

They are the latest immigrants whose fortunes have changed for the worse under President Donald Trump: More than 200,000 people from Central America and the region who are losing Temporary Protected Status after legally living, working and raising families in the United States for years.

Trump Ends Legal Protection for 200,000 Salvadoran Immigrants

Michael Winter and Roberto Lovato, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 8 2018 - 4:09pm

The Trump administration on Monday ended a three-decade program that provided temporary legal protection to more than 200,000 Salvadoran immigrants who built lives in the United States after fleeing civil war and devastating earthquakes.

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