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Civil & human rights

Latinos in This Liberal City: From San Francisco’s Big Strike to Gay Liberation

Eduardo Contreras, Jul 9 2019 - 7:55am

Years before charting the evolution and diversity of Latino political life in the city, a historian came here to become an activist. His book recalls major battlegrounds from the 1930s to the 1970s: union campaigns; civil rights organizing; elections; Great Society mobilizations; and feminist, gay and lesbian activism. Read an excerpt from “Latinos and the Liberal City” by Eduardo Contreras.

They Saved Girls and Women in Chinatown From Slavery

Julia Flynn Siler, Jul 2 2019 - 3:08pm

Donaldina Cameron captured the nation’s imagination at the turn of the 20th century. She was an early anti-human trafficking pioneer who ran a safe house for vulnerable girls and young women on the edge of San Francisco’s Chinatown. Read an excerpt from “The White Devil's Daughters,” by Bay Area author Julia Flynn Siler. 

Why Privacy Needs All of Us

Cyrus Farivar, Dec 17 2018 - 8:30am

One American city has gone further than any other in creating a workable solution to the current inadequacy of surveillance law: Oakland, which has pushed a pro-privacy public policy along an unprecedented path. Its Privacy Advisory Commission acts as a meaningful check on city agencies — most often, police — that want to acquire any kind of surveillance technology.

State Law Cracks Down on Free Public Meals

Yesica Prado, San Francisco Public Press — Dec 10 2018 - 12:08pm

Many city residents who are not housed or are food insecure depend on humanitarian aid from Food Not Bombs to survive. But state regulations taking effect in January jeopardize the group's 35-year mission of sharing food outside the confines of government bureaucracy.

S.F.’s Largest Landlord Sued Over Alleged Efforts to Push Out Tenants

Liza Veale, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 4 2018 - 2:20pm

Veritas Investments owns nearly 200 buildings in the city. It's been a target for tenant advocates, who accuse the company of building a business model that relies on pushing tenants out of rent-controlled units so they can be re-rented for much more. Veritas disputes the accusations that is “hostile or negligent” toward tenants.

Business Improvement Districts Use Public Funds to Pursue Anti-Homeless Agenda, Advocates Say

Rob Waters, San Francisco — Sep 18 2018 - 3:48pm

Nearly 200 California cities allow private organizations to manage key aspects of their downtown and commercial districts and to implement policies that restrict the rights of homeless people, according to a new report from the UC Berkeley School of Law.

Voters OK’d Legal Aid for Tenants Facing Eviction — Now Comes the Hard Part

Andrew Stelzer, San Fancisco Public Press — Aug 27 2018 - 9:19am

In June, San Francisco voters guaranteed legal help to anyone facing eviction, regardless of income. Now comes the hard part: Meeting the deadline to set up the multimillion-dollar program by July 2019. The results will likely to push forward a growing  “right to counsel” movement for civil litigation nationwide.

Activist Weiss Focuses Her Mayoral Campaign on Housing and Homelessness

Rob Waters, San Francisco Public Press — May 16 2018 - 7:25am

Amy Farah Weiss, founder of Saint Francis Homelessness Challenge, is an extra-long longshot to be elected the city's 44th mayor. In her second bid for City Hall, what she is doing is putting forward a detailed and wonky set of proposals for tackling core issues — and trying to impart a sense of urgency. Fourth in a series analyzing the mayoral candidates’ records and pledges on housing and homelessness.

Alioto Says Her Past ‘Housing First’ Plan Would End Homelessness

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — May 14 2018 - 7:04am

Angela Alioto points to 10-year plan to abolish chronic homeless she crafted in 2004 as a model of success that the city needs to revive. She blames the late Mayor Ed Lee for letting the plan wither and siphoning away money for other programs. Third in a series analyzing the mayoral candidates’ records and pledges on housing and homelessness.

Minority Challengers Wake Up Normally Sleepy Superior Court Races

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — May 9 2018 - 12:00pm

Five men and women of color are challenging four incumbent judges on the state Superior Court in San Francisco. The insurgents — four of whom are public defenders — say the veteran jurists are vestiges of a legal system that punishes minorities disproportionately. The candidates faced off May 5 at a forum focused on African-American issues, and sparks flew. Second of two articles.

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