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Civil & human rights

Activist Weiss Focuses Her Mayoral Campaign on Housing and Homelessness

Rob Waters, San Francisco Public Press — May 16 2018 - 7:25am

Amy Farah Weiss, founder of Saint Francis Homelessness Challenge, is an extra-long longshot to be elected the city's 44th mayor. In her second bid for City Hall, what she is doing is putting forward a detailed and wonky set of proposals for tackling core issues — and trying to impart a sense of urgency. Fourth in a series analyzing the mayoral candidates’ records and pledges on housing and homelessness.

Alioto Says Her Past ‘Housing First’ Plan Would End Homelessness

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — May 14 2018 - 7:04am

Angela Alioto points to 10-year plan to abolish chronic homeless she crafted in 2004 as a model of success that the city needs to revive. She blames the late Mayor Ed Lee for letting the plan wither and siphoning away money for other programs. Third in a series analyzing the mayoral candidates’ records and pledges on housing and homelessness.

Minority Challengers Wake Up Normally Sleepy Superior Court Races

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — May 9 2018 - 12:00pm

Five men and women of color are challenging four incumbent judges on the state Superior Court in San Francisco. The insurgents — four of whom are public defenders — say the veteran jurists are vestiges of a legal system that punishes minorities disproportionately. The candidates faced off May 5 at a forum focused on African-American issues, and sparks flew. Second of two articles.

Candidates Say How They Would Help African-American Community

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — May 7 2018 - 6:45pm

A trio of African-American organizations aimed to get some answers from aspiring local leaders at “Facing the Voters,” a candidates’ forum hosted by the Public Press and moderated by its publisher. The candidates were given the opportunity to lay out their bona fides with respect to this city’s dwindling, marginalized African-American community; some did that and some did not. First of two articles.

Proposition F: Free Legal Aid for Tenants Facing Eviction

Andrew Stelzer, San Francisco Public Press — May 1 2018 - 7:00am

On June 5, city voters could make history by guaranteeing legal help to anyone facing eviction, regardless of income. If Proposition F passes, it would make San Francisco the first city to pass such a law through a voter-approved initiative, and boost the national “right to counsel” movement.

An Ethnic Media Beacon Goes Dark, but Its Creator Keeps Inspiring

Rob Waters, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 3 2018 - 8:00am

Sandy Close has made it her life’s work to find and amplify unique voices from different ethnic communities, especially those of the young. For nearly 50 years, Pacific News Service and its successor, New America Media, practiced “journalism from the inside out” by bringing people from many cultures into the newsroom. Last fall, Close had to shutter her organization, but her legacy lives on in dozens of professional journalists who got their start with her.

Central Americans Tense as U.S. Ends Temporary Protection for Some Migrants

Roberto Lovato, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 15 2017 - 9:00am

Thousands of Salvadorans, Hondurans and Haitians who fled natural disasters or violence await final decision on whether their Temporary Protected Status will be extended or ended. Nicaraguans must leave in 2019 or face deportation.

Crissy Field Rally: Message of Peace Tainted by Violence

Rishika Dugyala and Sarah Asch, San Francisco Public Press — Aug 25 2017 - 12:53pm

Against the backdrop of recent right-wing violence, the organizer of the now-canceled Crissy Field “free speech” rally said he just wanted San Francisco’s moderate “good liberals” to reject the city’s “intolerance” and embrace his message of peace and love. Dubious, officials and counterprotesters sent him a different message.

A Legacy of Criminalizing Transience and Homelessness

Sara Bloomberg, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 30 2017 - 3:03pm

The California Legislature enacted the state's first anti-vagrant statutes in the mid-19th century, targeting Native Americans and Mexican-Americans. Since then, policymakers and voters have regularly acted to rid city streets of people who are homeless or indigent. This brief timeline highlights some key years and actions.

‘Quality of Life’ Citations at Record Lows

Sara Bloomberg, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 29 2017 - 4:02pm

As San Francico police respond to more calls for “quality of life” volations, citations have declined sharply in recent years, and the courts have been throwing out warrants for violations, quietly decriminalizing homelessness citywide, an analysis of city records shows.

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