sea level rise

Visionary Solutions to Bayfront Inundation

Mary Catherine O'Connor, SF Public Press — Apr 20 2017 - 8:00am

Responding to sea level rise requires actions that fall into three categories: fortify infrastructure, accommodate higher water and retreat from the shoreline. Given the economic and cultural ties Bay Area residents have to the water — retreat is a hard sell.

Local Planners Brace For Faster Antarctic Ice Melt

Kevin Stark and Ellyn Beale, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 20 2017 - 8:00am

Across California, policymakers and urban planners at every level of government are struggling with how to respond to new computer models that show massive ice sheets in Antarctica on the brink of collapse.

By Weakening Law, Developers Shift Sea Rise Burden to Cities

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 19 2017 - 8:27am

Two years ago, the California Supreme Court overturned decades of land-use law by upholding lower court rulings that cities could no longer require developers to take into account the effects of climate change on their projects. That decision has unsettled public officials and planners, and critics say it will allow real estate interests to saddle taxpayers with a gigantic bill to defend against rising seas.

Timeline: Lawyers for Developers Share Tactics to Blunt CEQA

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 19 2017 - 8:26am

Invoking recent court decisions, developers are pushing back on the ability of Bay Area cities to use the California Environmental Quality Act to regulate waterfront development and protect residents from rising sea levels

Projects Sailed Through Despite Dire Flood Study

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 19 2017 - 8:23am

A city-commissioned environmental study that detailed how the Mission Bay neighborhood would be inundated by rising seas in coming decades went unpublished for more than a year while two showcase waterfront developments won key approvals from city officials and voters, a Public Press review of records shows.

Q&A: History Will Condemn Today’s Leaders for Ignoring Rising Seas

Audrey Dilling, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 31 2017 - 5:16pm

We recently caught up with Nate Kauffman, a landscape architecture and urban planning consultant whose work focuses on sea level rise adaptation, at a presentation at the Exploratorium on how cities can better manage development along the waterfront. The talk’s setting was apt: The science museum focused on children’s education sits on stilts just a few feet above the San Francisco Bay along the Embarcadero, a facility almost sure to be flooded within 100 years.

Researchers: Abandon Neighborhoods, Avoid Flood Zone to Limit Sea Level Rise

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 30 2017 - 7:00am

The vision of a future San Francisco buttressed by dikes, levees and seawalls over coming decades is being overshadowed by an increasingly accepted alternative: moving away from the waterfront. Some experts argue that physical barriers offer only the illusion of protection and that cities should accept that some neighborhoods will need to be abandoned.

Waterfront Developers Would Be Winners in Proposed Property Tax to Fight Sea Level Rise

Kevin Stark, San Franciso Press — May 31 2016 - 8:30am

If passed, Measure AA would help protect coastal real estate from sea level rise by funding wetland restoration. Beneficiaries could include major developers and tech companies in Silicon Valley.

Silicon Valley Expansion Plans Risk Flooding From Rising Seas, State Planners Say

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 22 2016 - 5:39pm
Google, Facebook and others are building headquarters along the shoreline as scientists paint a grimmer picture for coastal development.

When Sea Level Rises, How Long Can Mission Rock Survive?

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Dec 2 2015 - 2:51pm

Voters approved the Giants’ $1.6 billion waterfront development, but environmental questions linger about whether Mission Rock could be occasionally or permanently submerged as bay waters rise by many feet before the end of the 21st century.

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