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Gavin Newsom

Proposition D Drains Mayor’s Power in Filling Supervisor Seats, Other Major Vacancies

Zachary Clark, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 3 2016 - 5:00am

Since 1948, every San Francisco mayor but one has appointed at least two people to vacancies on the Board of Supervisors. Incumbency has proven crucial, with nearly 80 percent being subsequently elected. On Nov. 8, voters will decide if they want to take back some power from the mayor's office.

Promise of Supportive Housing for Homeless Faces Reality of Short Supply

Angela Hart, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 13 2014 - 4:43pm

10 years ago, San Francisco’s politicians pledged to end chronic homelessness, getting the neediest people off the street through a “housing first” policy. Today that outcome is nowhere in sight. Few people are lucky enough to leave the streets through the city’s subsidized housing placement system, where some wait perpetually to receive a home. Part of a special report on homelessness and mental health in San Francisco, in the fall 2014 print edition. Stories rolling out online throughout the fall.

City's health plan risks reverting to safety net for poor

Angela Hart, SF Public Press — Mar 15 2012 - 8:26am

Local, state officials must develop new models for care by 2014

This story appeared in the Spring 2012 print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

San Francisco’s experiment in universal health care, which grew over the last five years to cover an estimated 85 percent of the city’s uninsured, may need to partly return to its origin as a network of safety net clinics and hospitals for the poor as national reforms syphon off middle-class patients. Healthy San Francisco provides medical services to more than 50,000 city residents. But the program could take a financial blow within the next two years as cities and counties adapt to national health reform.

Legal advocates give San Francisco low marks for penalizing homeless people

T.J. Johnston, SF Public Press — Dec 8 2011 - 4:34pm

A national homeless advocacy organization says San Francisco continues to make criminals out its homeless population. The National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty reported recently that the city and several other communities across the country penalize homeless people for behaviors related to their lack of housing. The Washington, D.C.-based group studied 234 U.S. jurisdictions, finding that San Francisco places prohibitions on 10 of 14 behaviors. Another local advocacy group recently graded San Francisco with a “D” for its policing efforts, but city representatives say alternative justice experiments are working.

Mayor: Social services agencies must plan for years of cuts

Kevin Stark, SF Public Press — Jun 10 2011 - 12:46pm

City Budget: Lee recommends 5-year planning for nonprofits

In a clear departure from his predecessor, Ed Lee, the city’s caretaker mayor, stumped across San Francisco’s 11 districts this spring criticizing ingrained budget balancing techniques as “an incredible act of disrespect.” His big new idea: to encourage nonprofit service agencies to plan their budgets on five-year cycles rather than groping year by year for funds to keep their doors open. That would go hand in hand with the city’s first ever five-year plan, released May 3, which projected a whopping $828 million shortfall five years from now.

Board struggles to choose an interim mayor

T.J. Johnston, SF Public Press — Jan 5 2011 - 4:10pm
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors spent eight hours debating who to select as interim mayor to finish Gavin Newsom's term and ended up delaying any decision until Friday. Angry lame-duck Supervisor Chris Daly blamed Board President David Chiu for a potential deal to install City Administrator Ed Lee in the post, vowing to "politically haunt you for the biggest fumble in the history of San Francisco politics." He then added: "It's on, like Donkey Kong."

Steering city’s homeless focus from sin to sickness

Teresa Gowan, Special to SF Public Press — Jan 3 2011 - 9:21am
In her new book on homelessness in San Francisco, “Hobos, Hustlers and Backsliders,” Teresa Gowan describes how former Mayor Frank Jordan’s framing of the issue in terms of crime and sin evolved into Willie Brown’s conflicted policies, finally emerging as Gavin Newsom’s version of “authoritarian medicalization” policies, most controversially the policy idea that got him elected in 2003, Care Not Cash. This essay condenses some of the discussion of the book (University of Minnesota Press, 2010). San Francisco, a historical stronghold of the labor movement, civil rights activism and other social movement activity, embodies the tension between valuable public space and progressive politics to a high degree, an important reason for the central position of the “homelessness problem” in the city’s electoral politics over the last 25 years.

Board delays picking new mayor until January

T.J. Johnston, SF Public Press — Dec 15 2010 - 11:31am
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors decided to put off nominating and picking an interim mayor until early January. On a 8-3 vote on Tuesday, the board delayed any decision to nominate Mayor Gavin Newsom's successor until at least Jan. 4, 2011, the day after Newsom is scheduled to be sworn in as the state's lieutenant governor. The Jan. 4 meeting would be the last meeting of the current board before four new members take office.

Effort to choose new mayor includes social network

T.J. Johnston, SF Public Press — Dec 6 2010 - 4:20pm
UPDATE: Assemblyman Tom Ammiano issued a statement saying he will not accept any nomination to be interim San Francisco mayor, according to SF Weekly. As the San Francisco Board of Supervisors prepares to hear nominations to pick a new mayor, one member of the board is turning to the Web to push his candidate. Chris Daly posted a petition on the Change.org social network site to draft Assemblyman Tom Ammiano into seeking the mayor’s office that Gavin Newsom’s election to lieutenant governor will leave vacant.

Muni: In elusive quest for 85% on-time performance, computers are displacing eyes on the street

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Nov 18 2010 - 11:11am

Transit agency says tech will help it turn corner, but money remains tight

Multimillion-dollar vehicle-monitoring technology installed at Muni headquarters is at the heart of a new initiative aimed at solving the transit system’s never-ending performance problems.

By investing $13.6 million in the NextMuni satellite tracking system and a new 24-hour vehicle monitoring center, San Francisco transit officials promise major improvements in keeping the city’s more than 1,000 buses and trains running on schedule. Already this year, Muni Metro trains in the Market Street tunnel are speeding up, they said.

But Muni managers are still struggling with the question of how to get the most out of this new technology to increase performance at a time when budget pressures make it increasingly difficult to do that.

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