climate change

Mapping the Shoreline Building Boom as Seas Rise

Kevin Stark and Mary Catherine O'Connor, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 21 2017 - 5:36pm

A 2015 analysis by the Public Press found that Bay Area builders were investing more than $21 billion in 27 large waterfront projects at less than 8 feet above high tide. That elevation could see occasional flooding by the end of this century. Since then, developers have crafted plans for another eight large-scale commercial and residential construction projects in that zone. Though not all amounts are yet known, we have tallied more than $1.8 billion in costs associated with buying land parcels and building these proposed projects.

Researchers: Abandon Neighborhoods, Avoid Flood Zone to Limit Sea Level Rise

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 30 2017 - 7:00am

The vision of a future San Francisco buttressed by dikes, levees and seawalls over coming decades is being overshadowed by an increasingly accepted alternative: moving away from the waterfront. Some experts argue that physical barriers offer only the illusion of protection and that cities should accept that some neighborhoods will need to be abandoned.

Silicon Valley Expansion Plans Risk Flooding From Rising Seas, State Planners Say

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 22 2016 - 5:39pm
Google, Facebook and others are building headquarters along the shoreline as scientists paint a grimmer picture for coastal development.

Major S.F. Bayfront Developments Advance Despite Sea Rise Warnings

Kevin Stark, Winifred Bird and Michael Stoll, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 29 2015 - 2:39pm

Builders plan to invest more than $21 billion in offices and homes in flood-prone areas, where waters could climb 8 feet above today’s high tide by the end of this century. Land-use records reveal that the building boom, fueled by a white-hot tech economy, is moving too fast for regulators to keep pace. (Cover story from the summer 2015 print edition)

Mission Bay Pioneers: Working and Living in a New Waterfront Neighborhood

Tanya Dzekon, Caroline Cakebread and Sophie Murguia, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 29 2015 - 2:31pm

As cranes and bulldozers continue their work to build Mission Bay, residents and workers say they love the new waterfront area. Few say they have any knowledge of, nor are they much concerned about, the long­-term flooding risk.

Four Ways to Guard Against Sea Level Rise

Winifred Bird, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 29 2015 - 2:30pm

Water brings both life and risk to the shoreline, so seaside residents have long built barriers, canals and other protections to guard against storms and floods. Now sea level rise is adding an extra challenge.

Bay Area Governments Study Sea Level Rise, but Few Set Limits on Development

Emily Dugdale, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 29 2015 - 2:29pm

The San Francisco Public Press surveyed 13 Bay Area cities and counties where building projects are planned in waterfront areas vulnerable to sea level rise. While most are studying the issue, few have passed new regulations to limit growth or require developers to flood­proof their properties.

With Dozens of Local and Regional Governments, Baywide Planning Is Hard

Winifred Bird, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 29 2015 - 2:28pm

Regional coordination will be essential if Bay Area cities and counties are to minimize flooding as the sea rises. A few initiatives have launched, but none yet has the legal authority or resources to align all 41 governments that border San Francisco Bay.

Experts Weigh In on Sea Level Rise

San Francisco Public Press — Jul 29 2015 - 2:27pm

Experts weigh in on the local effects of sea level rise. Hear from an oceanographer, an academic, a climate scientist, a policy professional and an environmental planner.

Interactive Map: A Baywide Building Boom Threatened by Rising Waters

Lulu Orozco, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 29 2015 - 2:26pm

We found 27 proposals for major construction projects that could be flooded in decades due to climate change. View our interactive map.

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