Aaron Peskin

S.F. Supes Eye ‘CEO Pay’ Tax to Fund Services for Homeless

Liz Enochs, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 27 2017 - 7:30am

Last year, Portland lawmakers approved a surtax on companies with high CEO-to-worker pay ratios and dedicated the revenue to homeless services. Will the San Francisco Board of Supervisors follow suit?

How to Fill All the Empty SRO Rooms

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 23 2017 - 6:51am

Master leasing of single-room occupancy hotels in San Francisco has housed thousands of homeless people — and done so in hotels that are, by and large, a huge improvement over those of a generation ago. But hings  could be better.

One Week of Homelessness Coverage, 11 Ideas About Solutions

Sarah Asch and Rishika Dugyala, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 6 2017 - 1:47pm

The weeklong S.F. Homeless Project, a coordinated reporting effort by nearly two dozen outlets, offered up some ideas that could contribute to the overall aim of ending homelessness — or at least proposals that could help homeless individuals cope better with life on the streets.

Candidates: District 3 Supervisor

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 19 2015 - 2:00pm

District 3 supervisorial seat on Nov. 3: incumbent Julie Christensen, former supervisor Aaron Peskin and Chinatown organizer Wilma Pang. Who are they and what are their priorities?

Growing pot should be treated the same as growing grapes: Q&A with lawyer David Owen

Hank Drew, SF Public Press — Apr 19 2011 - 12:26pm

David Owen was a freshly minted lawyer when he decided to open up a marijuana-focused land-use law firm in San Francisco. The former legislative aide to then-Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin had been involved in the early days of the city's cannabis regulation development. Since opening his firm, Owen has represented SPARC, a high-end medical pot dispensary, and helps local pot cultivators navigate conflicted legal waters. In light of regulation problems in Southern California and San Jose, Owen talked about the challenges of being a medical marijuana attorney as San Francisco’s once forward-thinking regulations have become "stagnated" over the past six years.

Financial upside for developers is long-term and risky, city says

Victoria Schlesinger, SF Public Press — Jul 1 2010 - 12:34pm

The developers of Treasure Island stand to earn a potential 20.6 percent return on their investments if the 18-year, phased construction plan and land sales proceed as they predict. That does not include possible future real estate sales.


Through two mayors, connected island developers cultivated profitable deal

Alison Hawkes and Bernice Yeung, SF Public Press — Jul 1 2010 - 12:22pm

In the next six months, local officials and a consortium of private developers will begin to finalize legal papers for Treasure Island’s future as a high-density eco-city. Renderings of the gleaming towers, parks and gardens suggest harmony and community. Yet the promise of an urban Treasure Island, one of the most complex and risky redevelopments in San Francisco’s recent history, has for more than a decade been wrapped up in a process driven by power and influence. The mayor got neartotal control. Political friends got plum jobs and contracts. Critics were exiled. City and state conflict-of-interest laws were waived. Independent inquiries and the will of voters were nakedly rebuffed.


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