Land use

Working Groups Envision Plans for an Affordable San Francisco

Justin Slaughter, Harry Gibbons, Victor Valle, Liz Enochs, Josh Wilson, Noah Arroyo and Lisa Weinzimer, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 16 2014 - 6:42pm

City residents, advocates and experts gathered at “Hack the Housing Crisis” to come up with ways to make San Francisco more affordable and create space for new tenants. Possible solutions included building portable houses and creating social media websites where renters and landlords could connect. Part of a special report on solutions for housing affordability.

Rebuttal to Beyond Chron Criticism of Public Press Report on Residential Hotel Vacancies

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 7 2018 - 12:10pm

Last week on his blog, Beyond Chron, Tenderloin Housing Clinic Executive Director Randy Shaw belatedly referred to my Fall 2017 Public Press cover story about vacancies in single-room occupancy hotels as "extremely misleading" and "false." I was disappointed, but not surprised. And I am not alone.

Guerrilla Art Project Uses News for ‘Housing Displacement Facts’

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 20 2018 - 9:00am

The fall 2017 issue of the Public Press, which focused on some possible  solutions to homelessness, inspired graphic designer Erik Schmitt to create informational labels he posted on single-room occupancy hotels listed as empty.

Community Workshop Attracts 200 Seeking Solutions to Homelessness

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 1 2018 - 4:13pm

The symposium, organized by the Public Press, was an all-day gathering of advocates, architects, journalists, activists, service providers, innovators, city officials, policymakers  and homeless men and women. But, before you can solve a problem, you have to know what the problem is. And, when it comes to addressing homelessness, there's a lot the general public  should know.

Critics See Environmental Threats in State Rule Changes That Speed Housing

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 8 2017 - 9:00am

Some environmental advocates say long-standing state rules governing soil pollution, traffic congestion and flood control will be weakened by legislation pushed by Democratic lawmakers from San Francisco and signed by Gov. Jerry Brown that will  “streamline” land-use regulations to speed housing construction.

Two Women, One Homeless, Team Up on a Small Housing Experiment

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 1 2017 - 8:00am

A 44-year-old retired firefighter calls herself a “guinea pig” in an experiment to create more shelter for homeless people in San Francisco. For the foreseeable future, she said, how she handles herself will “make or break” a pilot project involving a tiny dwelling on a private lot.

California’s Push for Affordable Housing Could Weaken Environmental Law

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Jul 25 2017 - 4:11pm

The Legislature’s efforts to ease the housing-affordability crisis could chip away at longstanding protections in the state’s landmark environmental law. Two such bills were introduced by San Francisco lawmakers.

Mapping the Shoreline Building Boom as Seas Rise

Kevin Stark and Mary Catherine O'Connor, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 21 2017 - 5:36pm

A 2015 analysis by the Public Press found that Bay Area builders were investing more than $21 billion in 27 large waterfront projects at less than 8 feet above high tide. That elevation could see occasional flooding by the end of this century. Since then, developers have crafted plans for another eight large-scale commercial and residential construction projects in that zone. Though not all amounts are yet known, we have tallied more than $1.8 billion in costs associated with buying land parcels and building these proposed projects.

Visionary Solutions to Bayfront Inundation

Mary Catherine O'Connor, SF Public Press — Apr 20 2017 - 8:00am

Responding to sea level rise requires actions that fall into three categories: fortify infrastructure, accommodate higher water and retreat from the shoreline. Given the economic and cultural ties Bay Area residents have to the water — retreat is a hard sell.

By Weakening Law, Developers Shift Sea Rise Burden to Cities

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 19 2017 - 8:27am

Two years ago, the California Supreme Court overturned decades of land-use law by upholding lower court rulings that cities could no longer require developers to take into account the effects of climate change on their projects. That decision has unsettled public officials and planners, and critics say it will allow real estate interests to saddle taxpayers with a gigantic bill to defend against rising seas.

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