Housing

Working Groups Envision Plans for an Affordable San Francisco

Justin Slaughter, Harry Gibbons, Victor Valle, Liz Enochs, Josh Wilson, Noah Arroyo and Lisa Weinzimer, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 16 2014 - 6:42pm

Hacking the Housing Crisis: Creative Ideas for Affordability

Citizens, advocates and experts gathered at Hack the Housing Crisis” event, to come up with ways to make San Francisco more affordable and create space for new tenants. Possible solutions included building portable houses and creating social media websites where renters and landlords could connect.

Pitching Visions of an Affordable San Francisco at ‘Hack the Housing Crisis’

Justin Slaughter, Noah Arroyo, Cori Brosnahan, Harry Gibbons, Lyndal Cairns, Liz Enochs and Josh Wilson, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 13 2014 - 5:35pm

Hacking the Housing Crisis: Creative Ideas for Affordability

San Francisco has become the epicenter of the Bay Area’s affordability crisis, with high-tech corporations moving in, rents climbing skyward, and despair and evictions sweeping through long-established but lower-income communities. Yet for the sold-out crowd of 140 housing-policy visionaries, advocates, experts and activists at Hack the Housing Crisis, San Francisco’s struggle to house its citizens is an opportunity to build a better city for all.

Housing Solution: Allow Off-the-Shelf Homes in San Francisco’s Underused Spaces

Cori Brosnahan, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 13 2014 - 12:50pm

Hacking the Housing Crisis: Creative Ideas for Affordability

Two Bay Area designers are re-imagining the home as a simple consumer good. If they and other entrepreneurs are successful, San Francisco’s marginal land — including parking spaces — could theoretically be retrofitted to accommodate hundreds or thousands of these barebones, movable living spaces.

Easy Solutions to S.F.’s Housing Crisis? Beware Unintended Consequences

Nathan Collins, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 12 2014 - 3:25pm

Hacking the Housing Crisis: Creative Ideas for Affordability

The road to hell is paved with good intentions and, very often, good urban planning policy ideas too. San Francisco and the Bay Area are no strangers to that road. Yet as talk of a housing crisis grows, the region may need a new attitude more than new ideas to avoid the mistakes of the past.

New In-Law Suite Rules Boost Affordable Housing in San Francisco

Rob Poole, Shareable.net — Jun 11 2014 - 7:09pm

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors recently approved two significant pieces of legislation that support accessory dwelling units, also known as “in-law” or secondary units, in the city. The first, introduced by District 3 Supervisor David Chiu and passed on April 17, enables existing illegal units to be legalized. The second, introduced by District 8 Supervisor Scott Wiener and passed on April 16, allows for the construction of new accessory dwellings in his district.

Housing Solution: Backyard Cottages Could Add One-Third More Homes to San Francisco

Cori Brosnahan, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 5 2014 - 4:00pm

Hacking the Housing Crisis: Creative Ideas for Affordability

San Francisco could boost its housing stock by as much as one-third — if only homeowners were allowed to build tiny, freestanding cottages in their backyards. This would satisfy the city’s policy of “infill development,” putting more housing on existing underutilized land. But first, the city would have to tweak existing building regulations tailored to mid-20th century lifestyles.

S.F. Mayor Counts Existing Homes to Hit Affordable Housing Goal

Noah Arroyo and Josh Wolf, San Francisco Public Press — May 13 2014 - 10:48am

Nearly 40% of subsidized units cited already exist

In his plan calling for 30,000 units of “new and rehabilitated” housing over six years, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee left many news organizations with the incorrect impression that one-third of those apartments would be additional units that most city residents could afford. Details of the plan actually show that a large fraction of the total consists of already-occupied public housing units that would be repaired, but add little the city’s overall affordable housing stock.

Seeking San Francisco Affordable Housing Solutions, 20 Seconds at a Time

Cori Brosnahan and Harry Gibbons, San Francisco Public Press — May 7 2014 - 7:49pm

A slew of housing experts each sped through 20 slides lasting 20 seconds apiece Tuesday night in a search for solutions to the affordable housing crisis in San Francisco. Not all of their ideas were entirely new, but some of the presenters fleshed out concepts that have been floating around San Francisco political and development circles.

Mission Accomplished? Currently Planned Housing Already Meets S.F. Mayor’s ‘Ambitious’ 6-Year Goal

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 13 2014 - 11:21am

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee’s goal of adding 30,000 units to the housing market by 2020 may not be as “ambitious” or “aggressive” as he claims. Records show that the city could hit that goal just with existing development projects and those currently under review. An assessment by the mayor’s office shows that at least 27,000 housing units are already in the pipeline for construction. In combination with the planned refurbishing of 4,000 homes, projects now in the planning process would more than meet the mayor’s goal.

Activists Call for Revival of Harvey Milk’s Anti-Speculation Proposal

Josh Wolf, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 10 2014 - 5:39pm

Before his death, Supervisor Harvey Milk introduced an “anti-speculation” proposal that would have heavily taxed profits generated by quickly flipping properties in San Francisco. Now Brian Basinger, a housing activist and former president of the nostalgically named Harvey Milk Democratic Club, is pushing for the city to resurrect it. The proposal was one of seven considered at Saturday’s citywide Tenant Convention at the Tenderloin Community School auditorium. Participants were able to rank their preference for various proposals by ballot. The event was the culmination of a series of neighborhood tenant conventions that aimed to generate ideas to solve the city’s affordable housing crisis.

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