Public Press wins an Excellence in Journalism award for ‘Public Schools, Private Money,’ in the winter 2014 edition

 

Amid budget cuts and institutional neglect, San Quentin’s arts education volunteers keep working

Ezra Carlsen, SF Public Press — Jun 22 2010 - 12:35pm

On a cool Friday night in March, near the corner of Haight and Steiner streets in San Francisco, the hip boutique Tweekin Records hosted an unusual gallery opening of paintings, sketches, poetry and elaborate collages. It was created by inmates at San Quentin State Prison.

Organized by Kate Deciccio, an artist and a mental health and substance abuse counselor in San Francisco, the exhibit featured her own work, along with work by Eddie Sanchez and “Absent” Helean from San Quentin, and by inmates in the John Howard Pavilion at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Washington, D.C. — Deciccio’s former employers.

Read more...

Playwright Octavio Solis: ‘Shake These People Up’

Karen Macklin, SF Public Press — Jun 22 2010 - 12:07pm

Octavio Solis’ critically acclaimed plays have been produced around the country, from the Oregon Shakespeare Festival to San Francisco’s Campo Santo and The Magic Theatre. His most recent work, “The Pastures of Heaven,” based on the Steinbeck novel, is in production until June 27 at California Shakespeare Theater.
The transplanted Texan and Sunset District resident has primarily written about El Paso and the Mexican border, but in recent years he has turned his pen to San Francisco, writing about bars, bandits, poetry-writing wolves and his adopted “city of love.”

Read more...

Bird shrink

Tay Wiles and Jackson Solway, SF Public Press — Jun 21 2010 - 4:46pm
Sorry, you need to install flash to see this content.

Dana Strome works in emergency rooms by day and is a bird shrink by night. That's right, a bird shrink who dedicates much of her life to the rescue of abused and abandoned parrots.

Video quilt stitches together stories of HIV/AIDS battle

Theresa Seiger, SF Public Press — Jun 21 2010 - 2:32pm

In the store it doesn’t look like much, but inside the booth on Castro Street something bigger is going on. Generations HIV, part of the HIV Story Project, aims to get conversation flowing about how HIV/AIDS have affected different generations by allowing people to record questions, answers or stories about the diseases within the booth.

Read more...

CSU raises fees by 5 percent

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Jun 18 2010 - 4:31pm

The California State University Board of Trustees voted Friday to raise full-time undergraduate and graduate fees by 5 percent. Full-time undergraduate students will pay $4,230, a $204 increase. Graduate students will pay $5,097, a $252 increase. Lt. Gov. Abel Maldonado and and Trustee Russel Statham voted no on the fee increase.

Car accident sends two children, three adults to hospital

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Jun 18 2010 - 12:09pm

Accident on Mission and Sixth streets sends at least five to San Francisco General Hospital.

Read more...

Brakes put on indigent transportation program

Conor Gallagher, SF Public Press — Jun 17 2010 - 6:01pm

The homeless and disabled are facing proposed cuts to a program that provides them with transportation to pick up prescriptions and obtain medical treatment. Mobile Assistance Patrol is facing a $300,000 reduction in funds for the 2010-2011 fiscal year, which means that the transportation service will operate for shelter clients only at night.

Read more...

Marathon public hearing decries cuts in health services

Katy Gathright, SF Public Press — Jun 16 2010 - 4:57pm

An overflow crowd at San Francisco City Hall testified into the early morning hours over proposed cuts in the public health budget. Mayor Gavin Newsom's proposed 2010-2011 budget would trim $6 million from mental health and substance abuse services in the city.

Keen questions from judge in Prop. 8 closing arguments

Kristine Magnuson, SF Public Press — Jun 16 2010 - 1:40pm

Five months after it began, closing arguments in the Perry v. Schwarzenegger trial are taking place today. U.S. District Court Judge Vaughn Walker, who is deciding the case, recently submitted dozens of probing legal questions for the teams representing both sides in the case to address in this final phase.

A look at life along 6th St.

Shawn Gaynor, SF Public Press — Jun 15 2010 - 11:21am

This piece was produced as part of a project sponsored by The Bold Italic. Sixth Street at Market is one of San Francisco’s most well known intersections, yet one of the least understood. People from all walks of life cross paths there, but most don’t intermingle. The neighborhood is well known for its gritty liquor stores, strip clubs, and SROs, yet the landscape is changing dramatically with pioneering restaurants, cutting edge galleries, and revitilization efforts taking hold. To get a better sense of what the intersection is really like, The Bold Italic decided to stay a while — for 24 hours in fact, and got their experiences on video as well. Have a look at a day in the life on Sixth Street.

Read more...

Parents rally to save child development center

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Jun 14 2010 - 6:33pm

The Children's Village Child Development Center will soon shut its doors as the San Francisco Archdiocese sold the property to a group of investors. At least 40 kids will be displaced when the center closes on August 31. Parents are trying to find ways to keep the center open, but have been unable to come to any agreement with the church or the new owners of the property.

Normally zen, tea lounge evacuated after crash

Katy Gathright, SF Public Press — Jun 14 2010 - 6:32pm

Samovar Tea Lounge, a San Francisco café, closed its Sanchez Street location on Sunday afternoon after an SUV lost control and crashed into its facade. Jesse Jacobs, founder of Samovar, said the crash forced the café to close for seven hours, costing the tea room several thousand dollars’ worth of business.

Read more...

Heart, neuroscience buildings to boost UCSF economic impact

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Jun 14 2010 - 10:26am

The University of California, San Francisco, is slated to begin several large new projects at the Mission Bay medical center, including buildings dedicated to cardiovascular and neuroscience research. UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann, who shared a new report on the impact the university has had on the city, said the university is the second biggest employer in the city.

San Francisco props A and B pass; millions more for school, safety retrofits

Theresa Seiger, SF Public Press — Jun 9 2010 - 4:55pm

San Francisco voters approved measures to retrofit schools and emergency services facilities Tuesday in an election in which five of seven local propositions passed. Twenty-three percent of voters showed up at San Francisco’s 590 precincts, passing propositions A, B, D, E and F. Proposition A, which will extend through 2030 a special property tax that was enacted in 1990, was approved by 69.9 percent of voters. Proposition B, the Earthquake Safety and Emergency Response Bond, was approved by 79.2 percent of voters.

Prop. A looks to extend school parcel tax another 20 years

Theresa Seiger, SF Public Press — Jun 7 2010 - 5:25pm

Proposition A on Tuesday's ballot seeks to extend a 1990 parcel tax aimed at helping fund capital improvements in the San Francisco Unified School District. In addition to authorizing the tax for another 20 years, it would also allow it to be increased annually, up to 2 percent, based on inflation.

Read more...

Prop. B would fix emergency water system, move police command center

Jerold Chinn, SF Public Press — Jun 7 2010 - 3:55pm

A $412 million bond measure goes before San Francisco voters on Tuesday. The money would go toward the repair of the aging emergency water system and for replacement of the police department's emergency command center. The measure is considered a key component in getting the city ready to handle the next big earthquake.

The USGS forecasts a 66 percent chance of a magnitude 6.7 or greater earthquake hitting the Bay Area within the next 30 years.

Read more...

Car-Free Challenge gets drivers walking, biking and onto mass transit

Anna Rendall, SF Public Press — Jun 7 2010 - 2:55pm

A Bay Area-wide challenge to get people out of their cars and into public transit, riding bikes or just walking is wrapping up today. On the event's Web site, participants log their miles for walking, biking, riding public transit and driving, car mileage goals and why they are taking the challenge

Fact check: ‘Yes on Prop 16’ ads don’t convey PG&E’s huge fingerprints

Dana Sherne, SF Public Press — Jun 6 2010 - 5:23pm

Tuesday’s statewide election features a controversial industry-backed proposition that would amend the California Constitution to require a two-thirds vote before a community could change its energy provider. The largest tonnage of paper political ads flooding mailboxes in San Francisco sport a variety of images — some ominous, some silly and sarcastic — but the same message: Proposition 16, the “Taxpayers Right to Vote Act,” protects voters from spendthrift politicians. But the ads, paid for mostly by incumbent power provider Pacific Gas & Electric Co., are misleading in a few important ways.

Black and white graphic novel gets colorful in gallery exhibit

Ambika Kandasamy, SF Public Press — Jun 4 2010 - 3:38pm
Sorry, you need to install flash to see this content.

How to illustrate idiosyncratic personalities coping with the monotony of day-to-day life? For San Francisco artist Jamaica Dyer, it’s no longer just black and white. The characters from her black-and-white graphic novel “Weird Fishes” take on a new life with her use of a soft color palette and gentle brush strokes. It is the story about two teenagers named Dee and Bunny Boy who grapple with issues of identity and question reality. An exhibition of her work is on display through June 13 at the Cartoon Art Museum’s Small Press Spotlight.

Read more...

SF budget plan cuts 993 jobs, finds hidden funds

Dana Sherne, SF Public Press — Jun 2 2010 - 1:11pm

Mayor Gavin Newsom announced his proposed annual budget Tuesday, with some new money and lots of cuts. By cutting 993 jobs and reducing some salaries, the city will save $64.2 million, he said. Full-time employment will be the lowest it has been in more than 10 years, he said, adding, “In the last decade, whatever we’ve done, we’re back to where we were in 1998.”