Guerrilla Art Project Uses News for ‘Housing Displacement Facts’

Joe Eskenazi, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 20 2018 - 9:00am

The fall 2017 issue of the Public Press, which focused on some possible  solutions to homelessness, inspired graphic designer Erik Schmitt to create informational labels he posted on single-room occupancy hotels listed as empty.

Mining the Internet Archive’s TV News

Noah Arroyo and Hyunha Kim, Public Press — Aug 19 2016 - 8:00am

The director of the TV News Archive sits down with us to explain how people can use the database to search for news segments and share them on social media.

Online TV Archive Preserves History of Politics Coverage

Noah Arroyo, Public Press — Aug 19 2016 - 8:00am

This publicly accessible tool helps journalists (and anyone else who's interested) for the first time to perform data-driven analyses of the content found on television.

Slick, Misleading TV Ads Paid Off

Meka Boyle, Cody Wright and Michael Winter, Public Press — Aug 18 2016 - 8:00am

The 2015 election united the political clout of two rich, powerful industries that will exert an enduring in uence across the city, Bay Area and nation: real estate and technology.

Election Ads Overshadowed TV News 7-to-1

Noah Arroyo, Meka Boyle and Cody Wright, Public Press — Aug 18 2016 - 7:45am

Bay Area stations surveyed aired a combined 25.8 hours of paid political ads. By comparison, they aired about 3.5 hours of election news coverage.

In Bid for Dominance, Mayor’s Allies Flood S.F. Politics With Corporate Cash

Angela Woodall and Michael Stoll, Public Press — Aug 17 2016 - 8:00am

Last year spending on local elections was the highest on record, reaching nearly $28 million. The infusion of cash demonstrates how politicians and their powerful associates wield an influence on the political process that our campaign finance laws cannot effectively or appropriately manage.

In the Heart of Tech, a Persistent Digital Divide

Peter Snarr, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:31pm

Internet access is increasingly taken for granted — for finding a job, attending all levels of school, managing a business, entertainment and communication. But 100,000 San Francisco residents cannot afford a home connection.

Media Struggled With How to Cover S.F.’s 2015 Mayoral Race

Sara Bloomberg, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 4 2015 - 7:15pm

With limited time and resources, San Francisco reporters said they chose not to focus on the mayor's race, instead dedicating copy to races whose outcomes were less certain — a choice that left some reporters conflicted about journalism’s watchdog mandate.

Twitter, Other Tech Companies Get S.F. Tax Breaks but Show Little Progress Hiring in Neighborhood

Yoona Ha, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 11 2013 - 1:51pm

The largest of the firms settling in mid-Market signed extensive community agreements, but critics call them toothless

Last year, 14 San Francisco technology companies received $1.9 million in tax breaks for setting up shop in the mid-Market Street area. Supporters said it was a good investment, bringing economic development and jobs to an economically depressed strip in the core of the city. The zone is certainly coming back to life, and the companies that benefited now employ more than 2,700 workers. But it is less clear that the deal resulted in entry-level jobs for residents of the hardscrabble neighborhood — one of the goals most sought by skeptics of the tax break. The largest six of the companies promised a list of community benefits that included an effort to identify qualified job seekers in the Tenderloin and mid-Market area. But the agreements are vaguely worded, the companies have been slow to report their progress to the city, and most were unresponsive to direct questions about employment practices.

This story is part of a special report on workforce development in the San Francisco Public Press fall print edition.

Gay Rights, San Francisco and the Media

Kevin Forestieri, Chorel Centers and Yoona Ha, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 26 2013 - 5:21pm

The coverage following the two Supreme Court rulings for same-sex marriage reflects the jubilant celebration of gay rights advocates, eclipsing dissenting opinions on the Supreme Court decision.

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