Join our summer fund drive! Become a member today to help us reach our $50K goal


Lacking Rent Protection, Artist Community Faces Displacement

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 16 2015 - 2:10pm

More than 70 San Francisco artists may have to leave the studios they've shared for a decade because their landlord wants to raise the rent significantly when their lease expires in June, and nonresidential space is not protected by rent control.

Bay Area Food Stamp Recipients Can Soon Shop Online

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 9 2015 - 10:30am

Bay Area residents who rely on food stamps to buy groceries soon will be able to use them online.

Hayes Valley Resident’s Artwork Unites Distanced Neighborhood

Erika Rae Langdon, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 20 2015 - 10:12am

Todd Young thought he was creating artwork for his mother’s enjoyment. Each month for more than a year, Young, 48, has created a collage on the metal front gate of his Hayes Valley home and photographed it for his mother.

Activists Call for Revival of Harvey Milk’s Anti-Speculation Proposal

Josh Wolf, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 10 2014 - 5:39pm

Before his death, Supervisor Harvey Milk introduced an “anti-speculation” proposal that would have heavily taxed profits generated by quickly flipping properties in San Francisco. Now Brian Basinger, a housing activist and former president of the nostalgically named Harvey Milk Democratic Club, is pushing for the city to resurrect it. The proposal was one of seven considered at Saturday’s citywide Tenant Convention at the Tenderloin Community School auditorium. Participants were able to rank their preference for various proposals by ballot. The event was the culmination of a series of neighborhood tenant conventions that aimed to generate ideas to solve the city’s affordable housing crisis.

Twitter, Other Tech Companies Get S.F. Tax Breaks but Show Little Progress Hiring in Neighborhood

Yoona Ha, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 11 2013 - 1:51pm

The largest of the firms settling in mid-Market signed extensive community agreements, but critics call them toothless

Last year, 14 San Francisco technology companies received $1.9 million in tax breaks for setting up shop in the mid-Market Street area. Supporters said it was a good investment, bringing economic development and jobs to an economically depressed strip in the core of the city. The zone is certainly coming back to life, and the companies that benefited now employ more than 2,700 workers. But it is less clear that the deal resulted in entry-level jobs for residents of the hardscrabble neighborhood — one of the goals most sought by skeptics of the tax break. The largest six of the companies promised a list of community benefits that included an effort to identify qualified job seekers in the Tenderloin and mid-Market area. But the agreements are vaguely worded, the companies have been slow to report their progress to the city, and most were unresponsive to direct questions about employment practices.

This story is part of a special report on workforce development in the San Francisco Public Press fall print edition.

Gay Rights, San Francisco and the Media

Kevin Forestieri, Chorel Centers and Yoona Ha, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 26 2013 - 5:21pm

The coverage following the two Supreme Court rulings for same-sex marriage reflects the jubilant celebration of gay rights advocates, eclipsing dissenting opinions on the Supreme Court decision.

New Owner Ousts Longtime San Francisco Bay Guardian Editor

T.J. Johnston and Miguel Sola Torá, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 14 2013 - 5:19pm

Tim Redmond, the longtime executive editor of the San Francisco Bay Guardian, left the paper late Thursday night after the owner forced him out, he said. Redmond said his dismissal stemmed from a dispute over personnel and editorial direction. Stephen Buel, editor of the Guardian’s sister paper, the San Francisco Examiner, called it a resignation. Buel said the Guardian has been losing money and Redmond resigned to prevent the firing of other staff.

Despite Lowered Expectations, Officials Still Say America’s Cup Will Bring Jobs to S.F.

Miguel Sola Torá, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 10 2013 - 4:01pm

The America’s Cup may not turn out to be the benefit to San Francisco that city leaders and private boosters once promised. But the city’s economic development officials still say taxpayers can break even by hosting a scaled-back version of the boat race this summer. Buried deep in Mayor Ed Lee’s proposed city budget released on May 31 was $22 million directed toward planning, permitting, emergency, security and transit measures for the America’s Cup.

Testing Online Privacy Limits, OKCupid Lets Strangers Read Intimate Messages

Rachel Swan, SF Public Press — Mar 25 2013 - 2:19pm

Users on the popular dating site might not be aware of it, but fellow participants have been tapped to be community moderators, who have access to private correspondence. Those with access to the “moderation” button often are checking accounts that have been flagged for possible terms of service violations. But they also get to eavesdrop on what many users assumed to be private conversations.

Food Prices at Center of Debate Over GMO Labeling in Prop 37

Ambika Kandasamy, SF Public Press — Oct 29 2012 - 12:20pm

Proposition 37, the state ballot measure requiring labels on genetically modified food, has revived a long-simmering debate about whether genetically modified food harms human health or the environment. But it’s the claim by opponents that food prices would increase that is riling proponents.

Syndicate content