The Public Press is meeting with neighborhood groups in San Francisco. Can we talk to you?

Scene

Well-Off Foodies, Bargain-Hunters, Cruise Different Aisles

Caroline Cakebread, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:42pm

Two different stores that target two distinct populations with different priorities: One serves the area’s longtime Latino residents; the other caters to those who can afford premium prices for freshness and the cachet of buying from local vendors.

In the Heart of Tech, a Persistent Digital Divide

Peter Snarr, San Francisco Public Press — Jan 21 2016 - 3:31pm

Internet access is increasingly taken for granted — for finding a job, attending all levels of school, managing a business, entertainment and communication. But 100,000 San Francisco residents cannot afford a home connection.

A Tale of Two Markets

Mark Hedin and Geoff Link, Central City Extra — Jan 21 2016 - 3:01pm

Mid-Market stores are worlds apart, a sign of rapid change.

Media Struggled With How to Cover S.F.’s 2015 Mayoral Race

Sara Bloomberg, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 4 2015 - 7:15pm

With limited time and resources, San Francisco reporters said they chose not to focus on the mayor's race, instead dedicating copy to races whose outcomes were less certain — a choice that left some reporters conflicted about journalism’s watchdog mandate.

Lacking Rent Protection, Artist Community Faces Displacement

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 16 2015 - 2:10pm

More than 70 San Francisco artists may have to leave the studios they've shared for a decade because their landlord wants to raise the rent significantly when their lease expires in June, and nonresidential space is not protected by rent control.

Bay Area Food Stamp Recipients Can Soon Shop Online

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 9 2015 - 10:30am

Bay Area residents who rely on food stamps to buy groceries soon will be able to use them online.

Hayes Valley Resident’s Artwork Unites Distanced Neighborhood

Erika Rae Langdon, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 20 2015 - 10:12am

Todd Young thought he was creating artwork for his mother’s enjoyment. Each month for more than a year, Young, 48, has created a collage on the metal front gate of his Hayes Valley home and photographed it for his mother.

Activists Call for Revival of Harvey Milk’s Anti-Speculation Proposal

Josh Wolf, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 10 2014 - 5:39pm

Before his death, Supervisor Harvey Milk introduced an “anti-speculation” proposal that would have heavily taxed profits generated by quickly flipping properties in San Francisco. Now Brian Basinger, a housing activist and former president of the nostalgically named Harvey Milk Democratic Club, is pushing for the city to resurrect it. The proposal was one of seven considered at Saturday’s citywide Tenant Convention at the Tenderloin Community School auditorium. Participants were able to rank their preference for various proposals by ballot. The event was the culmination of a series of neighborhood tenant conventions that aimed to generate ideas to solve the city’s affordable housing crisis.

Twitter, Other Tech Companies Get S.F. Tax Breaks but Show Little Progress Hiring in Neighborhood

Yoona Ha, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 11 2013 - 1:51pm

The largest of the firms settling in mid-Market signed extensive community agreements, but critics call them toothless

Last year, 14 San Francisco technology companies received $1.9 million in tax breaks for setting up shop in the mid-Market Street area. Supporters said it was a good investment, bringing economic development and jobs to an economically depressed strip in the core of the city. The zone is certainly coming back to life, and the companies that benefited now employ more than 2,700 workers. But it is less clear that the deal resulted in entry-level jobs for residents of the hardscrabble neighborhood — one of the goals most sought by skeptics of the tax break. The largest six of the companies promised a list of community benefits that included an effort to identify qualified job seekers in the Tenderloin and mid-Market area. But the agreements are vaguely worded, the companies have been slow to report their progress to the city, and most were unresponsive to direct questions about employment practices.

This story is part of a special report on workforce development in the San Francisco Public Press fall print edition.

Gay Rights, San Francisco and the Media

Kevin Forestieri, Chorel Centers and Yoona Ha, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 26 2013 - 5:21pm

The coverage following the two Supreme Court rulings for same-sex marriage reflects the jubilant celebration of gay rights advocates, eclipsing dissenting opinions on the Supreme Court decision.

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