Join our summer fund drive! Become a member today and help us reach our $50K goal.

Businesses Displaced by Fire Debate Whether to Stay or Go

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 20 2015 - 10:13am

Two months after fire consumed a building in San Francisco’s Mission District, many owners of the more than 30 businesses that were displaced are still trying to figure out how to cope with the steep price of reestablishing themselves.

Hayes Valley Resident’s Artwork Unites Distanced Neighborhood

Erika Rae Langdon, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 20 2015 - 10:12am

Todd Young thought he was creating artwork for his mother’s enjoyment. Each month for more than a year, Young, 48, has created a collage on the metal front gate of his Hayes Valley home and photographed it for his mother.

Shipping Container Homes Run Up Against Health and Building Codes

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 19 2015 - 3:30pm

Owners were forced to remove a controversial colony of shipping container homes from their West Oakland lot, under threat of fines.

Cleanliness, Congestion Pricing Idea Draw Hot Debate in BART Twitter Forum

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 16 2015 - 10:20am

In an hour-long Twitter forum in early March, BART staffers fielded rapid-fire questions, gripes and proposals from the public.

No Quick Fix for Funding S.F. Homeless Programs

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 13 2015 - 5:15pm

At a packed forum, politicians hashed out where San Francisco will find the money to build housing for the city’s current homeless population.

Pier 70 Waterfront Development Could Flood This Century

Kevin Stark, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 11 2015 - 12:00pm

New projections reveal that a major proposed housing and retail project could be underwater by the year 2100.

Supervisor to Consider Temporary Villages for S.F. Homeless

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 10 2015 - 11:15am

At tomorrow’s “Town Hall to End Homelessness” event, Supervisor Mark Farrell and homeless service providers will discuss potentially creating temporary villages where people could live while awaiting permanent housing.

L.A. Tries S.F.’s Retrofit Approach

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 6 2015 - 10:05am

Other California cities are following San Francisco’s example to compel owners of vulnerable apartment buildings to make them earthquake safe.

Muni Now Free to Some Riders

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Mar 4 2015 - 10:40am

This week the city starts letting some residents ride public transportation for free.

SoMa Building Boom Has Not Dented Demand

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 27 2015 - 12:30pm

About a third of the city’s new housing has been built in the South of Market neighborhood, which also saw some of the greatest price increases.

Mission Group Seeks Aid, Donations for Businesses Ousted by Fire

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 25 2015 - 12:00pm

After a severe fire destroyed 36 shops, stores and other businesses, a community organization has started a fund to help them get back on their feet.

S.F.’s List of Quake-Vulnerable Homes Continues to Grow

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 23 2015 - 7:30am

The citys official list of verified earthquake-vulnerable apartment buildings has hit 5,000.

Homeless Help: A New Plan

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 17 2015 - 10:37am

A new help center for the homeless will open in March, featuring client dormitories other amenities for limited stays. This is what the center will look like.

Maps Show Where Thousands of Cyclists, Pedestrians Hurt or Killed

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 16 2015 - 10:20am

As part of its new policy to reduce traffic deaths, the city has published maps that show where cyclists and pedestrians were serverely injured or killed in recent years, down to the nearest intersection.

Retrofit Law Has Nearly 100% Compliance Rate, So Far

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 13 2015 - 4:05pm

Two years into operation, the city’s seismic retrofit program is finding some success: Almost all of the targeted buildings’ owners have had them inspected. Only 18 scofflaws remain. But even for most of the compliant owners the hard part is yet to come: They will need to retrofit their “soft-story,” wood-frame buildings.

As Courts Flip-Flopped on School Integration, Diversity Has Remained Elusive

Sanne Bergh and Paul Lorgerie, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 5 2015 - 5:26pm

By 2005, when a federal judge lifted the most recent desegregation orders, San Francisco Unified School District had been trying for more than three decades to make its schools more racially and socioeconomically diverse, starting in 1971 with forced busing. San Francisco schools no longer exhibit the level of racial isolation they once did, but they are now resegregating, as are many others across the country. In 2013–2014, in more than one-quarter of city schools, 60 percent of the students were of one race. That is a far cry from 1966, when more than one-third of the schools had student populations with 80 percent or more belonging to a single racial group. (In 2014, just three schools were segregated to that degree.)

As Parents Get More Choice, S.F. Schools Resegregate

Jeremy Adam Smith, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 2 2015 - 9:40am

Each January, parents across San Francisco rank their preferences for public schools. By June, most get their children into their first choices, and almost three-quarters get one of their choices. A majority of families may be satisfied with the outcome, but the student assignment system is failing to meet its No. 1 goal, which the San Francisco Unified School District has struggled to achieve since the 1960s: classroom diversity. Since 2010, the year before the current policy went into effect, the number of San Francisco’s 115 public schools dominated by one race has climbed significantly.

San Francisco Schools’ Changing Demographics

Paul Lorgerie and Jeremy Adam Smith, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 2 2015 - 9:39am

Over five decades, San Francisco saw a demographic transformation in its public school system. In 1969, white and black students together were the majority, as in most of the rest of the United States. Since then, San Francisco public school enrollment has fallen by 39 percent, and almost all the missing faces are white or black. But the two groups have not disappeared in the same way.

Isolated Schools Clustered by Test Scores, Family Income

Jeffrey Thorsby, Emily Dugdale and Paul Lorgerie, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 2 2015 - 9:39am

If one looks at the San Francisco Unified School District as a whole, a clear pattern emerges: Schools with the highest level of achievement tend to have the lowest levels of family poverty. And schools that are identified as “racially isolated” are visibly clustered by both income and achievement. This plot shows the base Academic Performance Index for each school in the district for which data are available, as well as the percentage of students poor enough to qualify for free and reduced-price lunches, which are used as a proxy for measuring poverty.

Ranking Schools by Diversity

Jeffrey Thorsby, Emily Dugdale and Paul Lorgerie, San Francisco Public Press — Feb 2 2015 - 9:38am

Schools across San Francisco show markedly different levels of racial and ethnic diversity. Increasingly over the last five years, schools are dominated by one racial group. With mathematical tools, it is possible to measure which schools are the most and least diverse. We chose to rank schools using a formula that economists use to tell whether an industry is dominated by monopoly ownership, the Herfindahl-Hirschman index, also known to ecologists as the Simpson diversity index. The idea is the same: Sum up the squares of all the fractions of your sample. The higher the number, the lower the diversity.