The Public Press is meeting with neighborhood groups in San Francisco. Can we talk to you?

Government

Working Groups Envision Plans for an Affordable San Francisco

Justin Slaughter, Harry Gibbons, Victor Valle, Liz Enochs, Josh Wilson, Noah Arroyo and Lisa Weinzimer, San Francisco Public Press — Jun 16 2014 - 6:42pm

City residents, advocates and experts gathered at “Hack the Housing Crisis” to come up with ways to make San Francisco more affordable and create space for new tenants. Possible solutions included building portable houses and creating social media websites where renters and landlords could connect. Part of a special report on solutions for housing affordability.

Potentially Earthquake-Unsafe Residential Buildings — a (Very Rough) List

Noah Arroyo, SF Public Press — Jan 14 2013 - 1:51pm

This story appeared in the Winter 2012-2013 print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

San Francisco’s Department of Building Inspection has kept a preliminary list of potentially dangerous soft-story buildings since 2009, but inspectors say it has not been verified by actual building inspections, and was never intended for public consumption. Some of the addresses the city generated might be wrong. The Public Press is publishing the list so that residents who might possibly be at risk in their homes can participate in the debate over how best to retrofit thousands of properties in coming years.

Earthquake Retrofit Delays Leave Thousands at Risk

Noah Arroyo and Barbara Grady, SF Public Press — Jan 7 2013 - 6:38pm

It will take at least 7 years to secure older wood buildings dangerously perched above windows or garages

This story appeared in the Winter 2012-2013 print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

One in 14 San Franciscans lives in an old building with a first floor that city inspectors say could be vulnerable to collapse if not retrofitted soon to withstand a major earthquake.While officials have had a preliminary list of nearly 3,000 suspect properties for more than three years, they have not told landlords, leaving the estimated 58,000 residents who live there ignorant that their buildings could be unstable.

What Nevius Gets Wrong About Tech and Politics

Sara Bloomberg, San Francisco Public Press — Sep 9 2016 - 3:28pm

San Francisco Chronicle columnist Chuck “C.W.” Nevius is imploring tech companies “to get into politics, particularly grassroots politics in cities like Oakland and San Francisco.” But he misses the obvious: the tech industry is and has been deeply involved with local politics, led by Ron Conway (photo).

$2 Million Fills War Chests of S.F. Candidates as Races Heat Up

Sara Bloomberg, San Francisco Public Press — Sep 7 2016 - 2:55pm

With two months until Election Day, more than $2 million has been amassed in the collective war chests for local candidate campaigns, 90 percent of which has been raised for six Board of Supervisors seats.

Online TV Archive Preserves History of Politics Coverage

Noah Arroyo, Public Press — Aug 19 2016 - 8:00am

This publicly accessible tool helps journalists (and anyone else who's interested) for the first time to perform data-driven analyses of the content found on television.

Tracking TV News — and the Challenges Involved

Meka Boyle, Public Press — Aug 19 2016 - 8:00am

Despite numerous challenges, our findings quantified how the local election was covered: Coverage was scarce — and repetitive.

Mining the Internet Archive’s TV News

Noah Arroyo and Hyunha Kim, Public Press — Aug 19 2016 - 8:00am

The director of the TV News Archive sits down with us to explain how people can use the database to search for news segments and share them on social media.

The Most Misleading Political Ads of 2015

Noah Arroyo and Meka Boyle, Public Press — Aug 18 2016 - 8:00am

The Public Press reviewed more than 3 ½ hours of television news in the two months leading up to the November 2015 election, and found that ads far outstripped news about the elections in terms of airtime. 

Slick, Misleading TV Ads Paid Off

Meka Boyle, Cody Wright and Michael Winter, Public Press — Aug 18 2016 - 8:00am

The 2015 election united the political clout of two rich, powerful industries that will exert an enduring in uence across the city, Bay Area and nation: real estate and technology.

Syndicate content