A timeline of the old and new Bay Bridge east span

McSweeney's San Francisco Panorama/SF Public Press
 — Dec 8 2009 - 1:46pm

Also, you may enjoy browsing this dizzying, animated version of the timeline produced by David Cohn.


The Bay Bridge Report was produced Dec. 8, 2009, in collaboration with the San Francisco Panorama newspaper, which was published by McSweeney's. Help fund this story and others like it at Spot.Us.

UNPARALLELED BRIDGE, UNPRECEDENTED COST

HOW WALL STREET PROFITS FROM BRIDGE BUILDING

BUILDING THE BAY'S SIGNATURE SPAN

THE FINE PRINT: INTEREST DOUBLES THE TOTAL PRICE TAG

TIMELINE FOR THE BAY BRIDGE

GRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION OF THE BAY BRIDGE

CHIP IN FOR THIS REPORT ON SPOT.US

 

Comments

Rail road has been always the first choice rather than other transport especially when there is busy traffic on roads. Here i can see the full history of the Bay rail bridge since the earthquake strike. Lots of estimation, plans going along with the for it has been on work. Finally, the new bridge is to be finished and fully open for traffic in 2013. It will be the foundation of great hard-work and years of preparation and plans. Hope all goes well according to the plan.

I didn't notice any mention in these stories of the history around the decision to eliminate passenger rail service on the the Bay Bridge. What/who was behind that? What about the decline of ferry service? Do these issues relate to today's decisions about bridges and highways?

Also missing is any mention of the removal of the Key System railroad that operated on the lower deck of the bridge from 1936 to 1958. Removing the railroad increased automobile vehicle throughput but drastically reduced the "person" throughput capacity of the bridge. There should have been rail, or at least a flexible BRT and HOV lanes on the new bridge. Omitting these services condemns the new bridge to obsolesence even before it is completed.

I didn't notice any mention in these stories of the history around the decision to eliminate passenger rail service on the the Bay Bridge. What/who was behind that? What about the decline of ferry service? Do these issues relate to today's decisions about bridges and highways?