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Immigration

Letter From the Editors: Don't Take Civil Rights for Granted

Jan 19 2017 - 6:33pm

Education or deportation? That’s one startling question we are grappling with as San Francisco becomes more of a political outlier in the aftermath of the 2016 elections. The imminent need for documenting this divergence makes our jobs as independent local journalists more important than ever.

This letter is also available in Spanish, Chinese and Arabic.

لا تتخذ الحقوق المدنية لمنطقة الخليج من المسَلمَات

Jan 19 2017 - 6:27pm

التعليم ام الترحيل ؟

لعل هذا هو السؤال المحير الذي نواجهه لما تعانى منه سان ف ا رنسسكو من انح ا رف سياسى في أعقاب انتخابات عام

Community Leaders Strategize How Noncitizens Can Vote Amid Trump Vow of Deportation

Helena Ong, San Francisco Public Press — Dec 14 2016 - 6:19pm

The election of Donald Trump has cast a pall of fear and uncertainty after passage of Proposition N, as local stakeholders scramble to figure out how to enable the city’s undocumented immigrant residents to vote for members of the Board of Education without increasing their risk of deportation, which the president-elect has threatened.

S.F. Vote Counters Pushing to Finish by Thanksgiving

Noah Arroyo, San Francisco Public Press — Nov 18 2016 - 5:36pm

With San Franciscans still focused on President-elect Trump as Thanksgiving approaches, city officials continue to feverishly tabulate tens of thousands of ballots from the Nov. 8 election.

San Francisco’s Multilingual Schools Could Forge Path if California Measure Succeeds

Jeremy Adam Smith, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 28 2016 - 2:51pm

If California goes the way of San Francisco — creating more dual-language immersion programs and reviving bilingual education for immigrants — it would not just signal a dramatic change in education policy. It would also symbolize a massive cultural shift in the state. 

If Proposition 58 Passes, California Schools Might Not Be Prepared for Bilingual Ed

Jeremy Adam Smith, San Francisco Public Press — Oct 20 2016 - 1:50pm

State Proposition 58 aims to undo almost two decades of voter-approved state policy that has actively discouraged bilingual language education. But just as demand for bilingualism is growing, California lacks teachers, standards, curricula and reading materials.

Less Than Expected: Minimum Wage Violations in San Francisco (Video)

Tearsa Joy Hammock, San Francisco Public Press — Aug 7 2013 - 10:44am

Mauricio Lozano, a Salvadoran immigrant, was paid below minimum wage to work at a North Beach pizzeria. With the help of local nonprofit organization, Young Workers United, and the San Francisco City Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, Lozano won his case, recovering his rightfully earned wages.

S.F.’s Minimum Wage, Highest in the Nation, Eludes Thousands as Enforcement Efforts Face Obstacles

Aaron Tilley and Michael Stoll, San Francisco Public Press — May 1 2013 - 10:07am

10-year-old reform unfinished as businesses routinely flout $10.55 mandate, labor activists say

This story is part of a special report in the Spring print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

While San Francisco’s minimum wage is the highest in the nation, thousands of workers still earn below the current mandate of $10.55 an hour, say economists, anti-poverty activists and public officials. It has been 10 years since voters passed the groundbreaking labor reform, and the city has built a first-of-its-kind inspection team that has recovered back wages for more than 3,000 workers. But these efforts appear to have addressed only a fraction of the problem. ALSO: Listen to discussion of S.F.'s minimum wage enforcement on KALW Radio’s “Your Call” Friday Media Roundtable.

Indigenous People Face Obstacles Seeking Legal Pay

Jonah Harris, New America Media — Apr 24 2013 - 11:46am

Mayas from Yucatán find work in food service, but face language, immigration barriers

This story is part of a special report in the Spring print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

Few are more susceptible to the crime of wage theft than indigenous newcomers from Latin America, say labor experts, advocates for minority ethnic communities and immigrant workers themselves. Indigenous people from Mexico and Central America, who make up as much as 30 percent of the population of immigrants from there, are less likely to be literate, to speak either Spanish or English proficiently or to have legal documentation.

Restaurant Worker Paid Below Minimum Wage for ‘Training’

Tearsa Joy Hammock, San Francisco Public Press — Apr 22 2013 - 12:00pm

Food-service sector among worst violators of wage laws

This story is part of a special report in the Spring print edition of the San Francisco Public Press.

Last year, Mauricio Lozano found a job through a friend at a pizzeria in North Beach. The pay was $8 an hour, in cash. He said a supervisor told him he would get less than San Francisco’s minimum wage because he was “in training.” Under city law, that’s no excuse for paying below the mandated wage floor, then $10.24 an hour. But the restaurant needed someone right away, and Lozano was in no position to negotiate. 

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